Will those new plants survive

 

Springtime…… the arrival of warm temperatures, the end of another  long winter,  green grass emerging from the winter browns, trees sprouting leaves and the beginning of new growing season.  Spring is also the time a steady flow of people perform an annual ritual; a trip (well, usually multiple trips)  to the green house or garden centre to purchase new seedlings. They fondly recall how last year, they converted a drab looking yard into a colorful one adorned with beautiful flowers and healthy plants. And how those little seedlings flourished into a bountiful harvest of home grown food.
Tricks to the trade to facilitate a successful growing season and maintain healthy plants
We have all been witness to the fact that not every plant that looked so lush and healthy in the greenhouse ends up the same way when it takes permanent residence in our gardens or containers. Bedding plants, vegetables, flowers, shrubs, fruit trees, lawns, gardens and containers. It’s a lifetime of learning and experience, but Andrea Cleland of Arber Greenhouses offers  a few simple tips to start us on our way to  achieving a dream of a having beautiful and bountiful yard and garden.
“Now that it appears we can have our planters and baskets safely outside, here are some care tips to assure they remain lush and attractive all season long. Check now to see if there is a spot that still needs to be filled. Perhaps a plant has died or you may have underestimated the number of plants required. If any of the plants look small and skinny, pinch out the growing tip to encourage side growth.
Your containers and baskets are totally dependent on you for all of their nutrients. Just as a puppy will die if you don't feed it, so will a plant - the death just takes a longer time. Therefore fertilize with a weak solution of fertilizer every time you water or once a week at the dilution rate indicated on the fertilizer container. We generally recommend a 15-30-15 or a 20-20-20, all purpose fertilizer. Avid gardeners often fine tune their feeding programs so you may wish to follow their advice.
Deadhead flowering plants regularly - that is cut off the spent blossoms. This keeps the planter looking very fresh, plus allows the plants to support new blossom growth rather than producing seed.
If plants get gangly cut them back to about 4 or 5 leaf nodes from the root. Alternatively, practice the habit of cutting back one stem on each plant about once a week. You will never miss that stem and it allows the plant to put out fresh new growth from which the best blooms can grow.
Healthy planters and baskets can handle a lot but on those really windy days or if hail is a threat try to bring them in under some cover.”
Each yard, each garden and each plant will raise many questions.  
Andrea concludes, “Enjoy a long colorful summer with your beautiful baskets and planters, yards and gardens”.
More Stories:
  • The Old Car Detective Father and son with 1959 Cadillac hardtop     Jamal Salam of Mississauga, Ontario, owns an American icon, a 1959 Cadillac two-door hardtop with the biggest tailfins in town!  His Series 6337 Coupe de Ville came from Arizona ...
  • Why Annexation?     One of the questions that was asked at an Edmonton informational session last week has stuck in this reporters mind. The question was a simple one “What is the need to annex since the people remain the same regardless ...
  • “We’ve a Lot of Work to Do”     Those were the words from Tim Brockelsby, a Senior Planner for the City of Edmonton, at the conclusion of Edmonton’s second of five planned conversations with Leduc residents affected by Edmonton’s proposed annexation ...
  • Leduc Rural Crime Watch Award Cst. Mcfarlene, President Cor De Wit, Mayor Whaley.      The Farmers’ Advocate Office (FAO) has announced that the Leduc Rural Crime Watch Association has been awarded their 2013 Award for Excellence.      The award was established ...
  • 13,000 HOUR DONATION Executive Director, Petra Pfeiffer, thanks Jeannie Blakely on Appreciation evening. Whenever there is a crime or tragedy, there is a victim.           The word ‘victim’ does not adequately describe the complexity of circumstances ...
  • RURAL CRIME WATCH     The organization had been undergoing a serious decline in interest until the fall of 2011 and spring of 2012 when the community experienced a rash of break-ins and thefts. Membership spiked and with increased monitoring ...
  • Wetaskiwin Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast  City of Wetaskiwin Mayor Bill Elliot shows the ribbon shirt which was given to him by Laron Northwest on behalf of the Samson Cree Nation and Maskwacis.     Wetaskiwin's 23rd Annual Mayor's Prayer Breakfast was held at ...
  • Kids Making a Difference The 19th annual Leaders of Tomorrow Awards Program for Wetaskiwin and area was held at the Reynolds-Alberta Museum the evening of April 7th.  This is a program to recognize the good kids who are making a positive difference ...
  • Leduc City Citizens of Distinction     Annual ceremony hosted during Leduc’s Volunteer Appreciation Banquet.     The City of Leduc is pleased to announce the following recipients of the 2013 Citizens of Distinction Awards: Brianna Day  Athletic Achievement ...
  • Lakedell 4-H Beef Club     Our club has been keeping busy. In February we had our beef supper on valentines day with a great turn out. On the 15th our club attended the Red Deer Rebels game. We also had Public speaking on the 28th. All members ...
  • Spring Fling Mercedez Swallow creates a spotted puppy at the Spring Fling trade fair in the Wetaskiwin Drill Hall.      Wetaskiwin Chamber of Commerce hosts new features - Hosting successful events has challenges. But observing a steady ...




 
  • Leduc Radio Ad
  • Industrial Netmedia
  • Industrial Netmedia
  • Industrial Netmedia