Harvesting Memories

 

Ken Wood and his pre 1960 Farmall Super N dig so deep during the tractor pull event that his front end actually leaves the ground!
 
The Leduc West Antique Society hosted about 150 visitors at their Country Harvest event held on Saturday, September 15, 2012.
On what was predominantly a lovely afternoon, for us "city slickers" there were many different unique and interesting things to see that were simply the normal way of life for people living one hundred years ago.  
In the early 1900's, when you went to build your home, there was no such thing as just phoning up Rona and having them deliver your 2x4's to the worksite. No sir! If you were lucky enough to have one in your area, you went to your local sawmill, which was exactly like the one on site at the LWAS, and once you gave your order to the skilled men operating the four foot rotating saw blade, you could watch your lumber being cut to size right before your eyes.
Just off to the side of the sawmill on the LWAS grounds, there was a live demonstration taking place of how grain was threshed and separated way back when. Most of us in this province can appreciate how much work harvest time is for our farmers, but after viewing the demonstration of what that looked like 100 years ago, I think today's farmers are counting their blessings that they weren't born back then! 
To begin the job of threshing, one gentleman started up the kerosene driven Rumley Oil Pull, that had been built in 1911, and this machine ran the pulleys that made the actual thresher run. Two men stood on a wagon piled high with cut, ripe oats on the stem, and threw big pitch fork loads of oats, straw and all, into the top of the machine. The straw and chaff were separated inside the machine, and then blew out of a long pipe and formed a huge pile on the ground, while the oats themselves dropped into the belly of the thresher. Once the wagon was empty and all the grain threshed, it was quite shocking to see the large pile of chaff and straw the machine had separated, compared to the wee little pile of oats that came pouring out. It gave you a very good idea of the massive amount of work it would have required those farmers of old to do, just to get enough grain to feed their livestock and families over the long winter, not to mention enough seed for the next year's crop.
Of course, even hard working farmers need to have a little fun, and the competition of choice for any farmer worth his salt is, of course...a tractor pull! Some say it's the most fun you can have under 5 kms/hour! Everyone gravitated over to the bleachers once it was announced the tractor pulls were about to start, and found their preferred spot, whether it be at the starting line or near the end of the track. 
Several different categories of tractors were trucked in to compete at this event, with trophies featuring a model tractor proudly placed atop of a wooden base covered in bronze plaques, that were awarded for each division. The unique criteria required to compete at the LWAS pull was that your tractor had to have been originally built before 1960.
In a sport that is almost entirely male dominated, it was wonderful to see a young lady taking the gear shift in hand and challenging the men on their own turf. Kendra Wood climbed aboard her dad's bright red Farmall Super N, and in her two pulls, posted one of the biggest scores of the day by pulling over 400 feet! 
Another big attraction at every LWAS event, for those in the know, are the home made pies that are offered at the concession stand. They always sell out fast, so you have to be quick if you want a slice but it is always worth the rush. 
The pounding from the blacksmith shop echoed throughout the property, as the blacksmith hammered away on his anvil in front of his sweltering forge, making horse shoes, nails, tools and all manor of essential goods that people in the community required so long ago. This too was a very hard job, requiring not only brute physical strength, but talent to create the many and varied items made from metal. For example, have you ever tried to wear shoes that don't fit? If so, then think of how a poor horse would feel with ill fitting iron shoes nailed onto his foot! A good blacksmith was a point of pride for a community to have back in the day. 
There is always so much to see at the Leduc West Antique Society that the day can fly by before you know it. It's a fabulous place to take the whole family and rediscover your roots. The LWAS is one of those rare places that makes you appreciate today, but still long for a bit of the past. And here, you can find just that.
More Stories:
  • The Old Car Detective Kapuskasing to Kingsville in a 1951 Hudson Pacemaker     Leamington chiropractor Dr.Henry Reimer was 16 in the summer of 1966 when he visited his older brother in the northern Ontario town of Kapuskasing.  He would be attending ...
  • The Growth of Cities     Once mankind had discovered the advantages of farming over running around the countryside looking for berries to gather and animals to hunt we began to gather together in places where agricultural could be expanded. Generally ...
  • WHAT’S UP WITH THAT TRAFFIC? Sitting at a red light when you have places to be is frustrating but the City of Leduc is doing what it can to alleviate congestion in Leduc Common.     “It’s a busy intersection, I’ll give you that,” said Kevin Cole, Director ...
  • Mayor’s Prayer Breakfast A pig farmer from central Alberta says everyone can make a difference in their community and the world, no matter what their talents or skills are.     Speaking to a full house at the 2014 Joint Mayors Prayer Breakfast April ...
  • Aquatic Leadership in Leduc     A new aquatics leadership pilot program for high school students will be introduced this fall in partnership with the Leduc Recreation Centre, enabling them to receive credits for graduation and the potential of employment ...
  • Lakedell 4-H Achievement Dear Reader,     It’s awesome how one day led to a group of determined people and two days of fun filled 4-H events. Early in February, the Lakedell Agricultural Society hosted the annual multi-species judging. Susann Stone ...
  • Leduc Annexation Open House For a video of this event click this link. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZuF4pu3smS8      The first Open House on Edmonton’s planned annexation, hosted by the County of Leduc, was held on Wednesday, April 2nd at the Nisku ...
  • RAM wins big in Los Angeles     The Reynolds Alberta Museum (RAM) has been attending and competing in the National Association of Automobile Museums (NAAM) awards program since 2006.  The wall in the museum that displays a variety of awards they have ...
  • The 35th Annual Wetaskiwin Music Festival Michaela Strydom Overall Intermediate Piano Performer, Alayna Chrunik Overall Piano Grade IV & Under Performer & Overall Vocal performer 11 years & under, Megan Strydom Overall Dr. Richard Bellamy Junior Piano Performer, ...
  • Needed, 1.5 Million Litres of H2O    It’s getting close. During a recent tour of the new Manluk Centre led by Kevin Lucas, Director of Community Services for the City of Wetaskiwin, he declared, “the Manluk Centre is near substantial completion and on May ...
  • Reflections On TRC Left to right: Annie Smith, Krista Rogers, Winter Eriksson, Shelby Caron, Celina Baird,Dustin Quinlan Gary Hill. Front Row : Eduard Frye , Evan Dinner, Cody Quinlan.      When I attended the TRC hearings in Maskwacis last ...
  • Is Wildrose the Future for Alberta?     Wildrose party leader, Danielle Smith, is hosting a Meet and Greet on Tuesday, April 15th from 7-9 p.m., at the Super 8 Hotel at 3820-56 Street in Wetaskiwin. The Meet and Greet gives Albertans a chance to bring up concerns ...
  • Daffodils & Tea Friends and residents enjoy the day at Sunrise Manor.     The words Sunrise and daffodils were not indicative of the weather at Sunrise Village on the day of their annual Daffodil Tea.  The streets surrounding Sunrise Village, ...
  • Learning Council Reflections     Forty years ago a group of Wetaskiwin and area residents recognized the need to identify and coordinate local resources to meet the changing learning needs of adults. The Wetaskiwin & Area Community Learning Council was ...
  • Chamber Hosts AGM And Spring Sessions     Laughter pealed from the conference rooms at the Wayside Inn on March 25th as motivational speakers entertained, educated and motivated local business people. Spring Session, a new twist on the traditional AGM, was an ...
  • Celebrating 50 Years Warburg Seed Cleaning Co-op Celebrates 50 years of service to area farmers. Pictured here are the past and present directors who attended the celebration. Tom Luethi, Plant Manager is also shown in the photo.         On ...
  • 4-H Club Reports Gwynne 4-H Club Report     Hello, I am Jake Emmerling, the reporter for the Gwynne 4-H club. We are one of the smaller clubs, but that doesn’t stop us from having lots of fun and exciting adventures!          For our first ...
  • Watoto On The Go   TO WATCH THE VIDEO OF THIS EVENT CLICK THIS LINK    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HnRuq5Uz2Pg The Watoto African Children's Choir was hosted by Zion Lutheran church in Wetaskiwin on March 22nd.  The Watoto Choir will ...
  • Halliburton Decision Delayed Leduc - The County of Leduc’s decision to approve Halliburton’s development permit for a chemical mixing and storage facility has been deferred for the second time to April 22nd.     The permit had been deferred at the Feb ...
  • Local Saputo To Close Doors     On March 31st, exhaust was exiting from the Saputo plant into the chilly air in Wetaskiwin but we do not know for how long. On Wednesday, March 26th employees received disheartening news that the Wetaskiwin Saputo plant ...




 
  • Leduc Radio Ad
  • Industrial Netmedia
  • Industrial Netmedia
  • Industrial Netmedia