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Mayor Wadsworth: a politician with a cause

Town of Millet mayor Tony Wadsworth fulfilled his promise and stalled getting his hair cut until the community finally saw its new waterline commissioned after more than 10 years of delays. The line was commissioned April 10 and Wadsworth visited Heather’s Hair Designs on April 12. - Amelia Naismith
Town of Millet mayor Tony Wadsworth fulfilled his promise and stalled getting his hair cut until the community finally saw its new waterline commissioned after more than 10 years of delays. The line was commissioned April 10 and Wadsworth visited Heather’s Hair Designs on April 12.
— image credit: Amelia Naismith

The almost two decades of continual delays of the new Millet Water Line has left local officials and residents in a hairy situation. But now the wait has ended.

The waterline for Millet was commissioned April 10.

Mayor Tony Wadsworth says it has been 15 to 20 years since the residents of Millet first heard about the regional waterline meant to bring Edmonton water to the town.

Since then many had started to lose faith in the completion of the project. “The promise has been a long time coming,” said Wadsworth.

Wadsworth says last fall he was speaking with some of the older residents in the community, trying to bring them something substantial they could believe in. “Thinking it would just be a month or two I said ‘I promise you it is coming. I promise you I won’t cut my hair until then.’”

He was finally able to fulfill his promise and made a hair appointment at Heather’s Hair Designs in Millet on April 12, approximately six months after he first made the decision to let his locks grow.

Wadsworth’s longer hair has been a part of his character the majority of his adult life. “I tend to wear it long. So I put it on the line.”

Educated in Liverpool, England, Wadsworth was required to keep his hair short and was sometimes sent home from school to get a haircut.

“When I left school I just became a rebel,” said Wadsworth.

The initial cost of the project was set at $11 million, with 90 per cent being covered by the provincial government. However, due to the delay the cost of the project was reduced by $3 million, leaving Millet to pay $800,000. “The delay has directly resulted in the town saving $300,000, and the province $3 million,” said Wadsworth.

On April 21 the Town of Millet and the Capital Region Southwest Water Services Commission is holding the grand opening for the waterline at Griffiths-Scott Middle School. Speeches start at 2:30 p.m. and Wadsworth says the fire hydrant will be turned on at 3:15 p.m.

If the weather is too cold that day a temporary line will be run in to the school for the ceremony.

Wadsworth says the students have been working on water projects the past few months, aimed at educating on the importance of a water. The projects will be on display the day of the grand opening and some students will be making small presentations.

Wadsworth says the water coming from Edmonton will be healthier than Millet’s well water; it will contain calcium, magnesium and a different kind of chloride. The water will not contain sodium. “Which has always been the big problem here.”

He adds, with the new waterline, residents may even see the life expectancy of their hot water heaters improve.

The water line will also bring and endless water supply to town, while keeping the municipality’s reservoir full, ensuring there will be enough water on hand in the event of fires or emergencies.

 

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