Crash in Leduc County sends tow truck operator, two more to hospital

RCMP are reminding motorists that winter driving requires more patience and caution than perhaps summer driving does.

Results of collisions involving icy roads and a tow truck.

RCMP are reminding motorists that winter driving requires more patience and caution than perhaps summer driving does.

A serious collision on Hwy #2 in Leduc County required multiple hospital visits, and involved traffic colliding with a tow truck that was in a ditch and had emergency lights flashing, stated Leduc RCMP Cpl. Chris Mosley.

“On Friday, December 23, 2016 at about 7:10 p.m., the Leduc RCMP responded to a report of a collision involving a tow truck on Highway 2, near Highway 19,” stated Cpl. Mosley in a press release.

“The tow truck operator had been recovering a vehicle from the center median, when it was struck by a southbound vehicle that lost control due to the poor road conditions.

“The tow truck operator was able to escape injury initially, but sustained non-life threatening injuries when a second southbound vehicle hit the tow truck again, which in turn collided with the tow operator who was standing outside.

“The occupants of the southbound vehicles involved sustained minor injuries. At the time of the collision, the tow truck operator was using his vehicle mounted amber emergency lights.

“Due to the deteriorating road conditions and to prevent further risk to tow operators, the Leduc RCMP initiated a tow advisory, during which time the removal of vehicles from Highway 2 was not recommended.”

Mosley said there are a lot of strategies motorists can use to keep themselves away from such incidents. “I would say get the proper tires,” said Mosley by phone Dec. 28.

He stated that motorists should prepare their vehicle for winter and have it equipped accordingly.

He also said driving to the road conditions is key, slowing down where the road is icy. “That’s the big thing,” said the corporal.

Cpl. Mosley said some motorists may think four-wheel drive vehicles are invincible on icy roads. “That’s not the case,” said Mosley. “There’s still a requirement to maintain traction going forward.” He said 4X4 vehicles can get going better in icy conditions, but it does nothing to aid in braking.

As well, Mosley said when motorists can see an accident or vehicle with emergency lights flashing, there’s only one thing to do. “They should be slowing down,” he said. ‘Drivers need to slow down to 60 km/hr or the posted limit, whichever is less. This law applies to the lane immediately next to the stopped vehicle.”

One more safety tip for winter driving: keep loose items in your vehicle to a minimum. Mosley said it’s not unusual for motor vehicle accidents to end in a rollover, resulting in loose objects flying around the vehicle.

Mosley said the last thing you want to see in the rollover is a hockey skate flying through the air.