What did they promise in 2010

  • Fri Sep 6th, 2013 8:00pm
  • News

Pipestone Flyer

    An election promise is a promise made to the public by a politician who is trying to win an election. They have long been a central element of elections and remain so today. Election promises are also notable for often being broken once a politician is in office.

    Election promises are part of an election platform, but platforms also contain vague ideals and generalities as well as specific promises. They are an essential element in getting people to vote for a candidate. For example, a promise such as to cut taxes or to introduce new social programs may appeal to voters.  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Election_promise

    So, let’s nose around and explore some of the promises made by candidates in the 2010 City of Wetaskiwin municipal election and you can decide the outcome.

The promise: We’re going to have a Main Street that will attract more people, more businesses and investments which will lead to increased pride and will create a safer downtown.

The promise: To replace the pool with a new pool can be done with very little tax increase. A new pool with the amenities found in nearby communities could incur tax increases but will seek out fundraising opportunities to offset any tax increases.

The promise: The main street project will be mainly funded by grants, and the aquatic centre will not be built until we know how it will be paid for however, some debenture debt for this project will allow future users to participate in the cost of the facility.  We watch our debt load very closely and there will be opportunities to build the project without raising taxes.

The promise: We need to change our opinion of our community as well as our neighboring communities, let them all know, "We are proud to call Wetaskiwin home". 

The promise: Fiscal Responsibility: Protecting the financial health of the city with thorough evaluation of innovative, affordable, and lasting solutions.

The promise: I see major issues in infrastructure that need to be managed in a way that will not leave the residents of Wetaskiwin penniless.

The promise: I am running for a number of reasons, but most importantly because we need responsible government that is accountable to the people and makes decisions that will promote growth.

The promise: The development of a multi-use recreation facility is a major topic.  On one hand, such a facility would be a great addition to Wetaskiwin.  On the other hand, building it to a scale that Wetaskiwin cannot afford and managing it poorly would be a hit that we would be paying for, literally, for decades to come.  

The promise: We must concentrate on our economic development plan to enhance growth and business within Wetaskiwin.

The promise: If we set our main goal as economic and social growth, we can use that as the litmus test for our decisions. This way we can ensure that decisions are based on what is best for the development of Wetaskiwin, keeping in mind our responsibility to innovative, affordable, and lasting solutions. 

The promise: Key issues in Wetaskiwin are lack of development growth, a safe and clean community, and recreation facilities. For years we have watched our shopping dollars migrate out of our community to our surrounding neighbors.

The promise: The most important thing that should be done to ensure progress in the next three years is the City can and must work with developers, all levels of  Government and the community to find positive growth strategies.

The promise: The same good old boys club that we've had for years, is about to come to an end if I have anything to say about it. I would think that the best qualified people to run a city would have a strong business background with experience in the private sector.

The promise: We have developed an economic development plan, and municipal sustainability plan. It is vital that the next Council move these plans forward as they will assist the City in providing more commercial opportunities and a better lifestyle. These plans will assist us to grow.

The promise: With the closing of the Edmonton Centre Airport, I feel that we need to expand our runway, now, so that we can attract businesses that will need to relocate.

Entering the 2013 election campaign

    The public perceive that a great number of election promises are broken. Many regard this as a severe issue that disaffects people from the entire political process, increasing apathy and lowering voter turnout. Election promises have been broken for as long as elections have been held and this is likely to continue, although defining  a broken promise is difficult.

    Following Nomination Day, September 23rd and Election Day, October 21st, whenever you hear the politicians making promises, remember they are promising ways that they will be spending your tax dollars. Your question to them is not, ‘what do you promise?’  but rather ‘how will you carry out that promise?’.