Youth curfews, not the best crime fighting tool

As good as it may seem on the surface, a youth curfew with monetary penalties for parents will probably do very little in the way of decreasing the number of thefts, property crimes and other similar offenses of the area.

While poking around on the Wetaskiwin Rant and Rave Facebook site, and seeing a social experiment public poll on the matter, the idea of a curfew, as well at the Wetaskiwin, Leduc and Beaumont results posed an interesting question; especially with two of the three communities having more ‘no’ votes than ‘yes’, which was surprising.

A curfew in communities as large as Wetaskiwin, Leduc and Beaumont would face enforcement challenges. Random cruises don’t seem like the most fruitful or time-effective method, and increased patrols in targeted problem areas will only keep any devious youths off the streets for as long as it takes them to find a new location.

While most communities exclude youths who are out after hours due to work, volunteering, sports, or other adult supervised activities, as well as the areas outside immediately in front of the home, it could be difficult to prove why someone is outside. Maybe not so much in the very early hours of the morning but closer to the when the curfew starts.

Peace of mind and parental control seem like they would be benefits of s curfew. But are those obstinate enough to disobey parents who want the child home at a decent time suddenly going to become more complaint simply because there is now a bylaw in place?

And, eventually youth will age out of the parameters encompassed in the curfew. But that does not mean they automatically become upstanding members of society simply based on their age.

To address crime levels of the area, education starting at a young age seems like a better tactic.

Having searched back through RCMP press release emails — exempting most traffic collisions and missing persons reports — the message was pretty clear. While most did not include suspect ages because the suspects were unidentified, the majority with listed ages were of people above 18 years old. Of those below the age of 18: four files were of serious cases such as stabbing, dangerous driving and armed robbery. The remaining three cases were a break and enter, stolen property and theft.

Youth is not synonymous with delinquency and more mature ages does not guarantee a respect for other or their property.

While a curfew would be a positive, although not without many challenges, simply because youth do not need to be wandering the streets at all hours, it don’t not seem like a practical crime prevention tactic.

amelia.naismith@pipestoneflyer.ca

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Wetaskiwin shelter will close early after assaults, other problems

Mayor Tyler Gandam said mental health, addictions overshadowing shelter’s purpose

Ephraim Girling Brings The Law To Wetaskiwin

No-nonsense police officer didn’t mess around with law-breakers

New intersection coming for Hwy. #2A near grain terminal

G3 Canada will begin new intersection in 2020

Franchises a great option for business-minded

BMO expert gives brief look at 2020

County of Wetaskiwin transfer donated land to Scouts Canada body

A.L. Siler originally asked county to hold land in trust in 1972

Fashion Fridays: The 8 best quality online stores! Shop the ultimate sales

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

VIDEO: Outpouring of worldwide support for bullied Australian boy

Australian actor Hugh Jackman said ‘you are stronger than you know, mate’

Trudeau: Time for blockades to end and Indigenous leaders to work with government

Prime minister says situation in Coastal GasLink pipeline dispute is ‘unacceptable and untenable’

Canadians released from coronavirus-ridden cruise ship in Japan fly home

Those who were cleared to travel are to be screened again at Canadian Forces Base Trenton

Study says flu vaccine protected most people during unusual influenza season

Test-negative method was pioneered by the BC Centre for Disease Control in 2004

Saskatchewan and B.C. reach championship round at Scotties

British Columbia’s Corryn Brown locked up the last berth in Pool B

Portrait of the Coastal GasLink, a pipeline to divide a nation

In mid-February, 46 per cent of the pipeline route had been cleared

Alberta ends master agreement with doctors, new rules to be in place April 1

The current master agreement with physicians ends March 31

Alberta rail conductor fired for social media posts awarded money, but not reinstatement

Arbitrator Richard Hornung says that he agreed with the Teamsters union

Most Read