Both Cast and Building, A Work in Progress

Pipestone Flyer

    Surrounded by pipes, scaffolding, ladders and construction materials in the Waterworks Theatre is a newly constructed stage. On the stage are modest props, two sets of spot lights on stands, light cords strung from the ceiling and dark curtains providing a backdrop.  On stage, some of the actors and actresses are experiencing difficulty remembering their lines.  Others are sitting in the audience diligently studying their scripts, and with some anxiety, are patiently waiting their turn to take to the stage.  This is the day of the first rehearsal of the production of The Importance of Being Earnest by the Waterworks Theatre Society. Time is becoming a valuable commodity for Directors Don Berner and Ted Eden and the entire cast as the production is taking place on February 22nd to 24th and March 1st to 3rd.  

    Although this is not the first production in the Waterworks Theatre (5002 53 Ave. directly north of the Memorial Arts Centre), it is the first production on the newly constructed Waterworks stage.  The entire building is a work-in-progress but considerable progress has been made. Remodeling and renovating an old building is a daunting task; and even more so on a shoestring budget. The stage has recently been installed. There are walls that will have to be painted, flooring installed, perhaps more sophisticated lighting and sound systems and updating of utility systems that will all require endless dollars and volunteer hours. 

    But, this is a group of local people with great theatrical talent that is fueled by a passion for everything this activity has to offer. You can tell that many hundreds of volunteer hours have been spent to bring the building to a state where it can actually house a performance. At first glance it may appear to be a little unkempt. But after being immersed into the ambiance the facility offers, it grows on you as a theatrical setting. Black support beams, the outline of a structure that had been removed leaving an outline in the paint, dark colored backdrops contrasting with red brick walls and modest furniture and props. But perhaps most striking feature is the curved brick and wood arches surrounding the windows mounted in the red brick walls.  The building grows on you as a theatrical setting and becomes a production in itself. 

    The Waterworks Theatre Society preparing for a first-class performance

    The Waterworks Theatre Society has a history of providing consistent first class performances. The first hour of the first rehearsal is already clearly showing signs of another remarkable performance. The cast, much like the decor in the Waterworks Theatre, exhibited some minor flaws.  But,  both are showing signs of a fantastic final product.  Come February 22nd, the lights for the first performance come on, the jitters are present and the audience has great expectations. The play progresses, the jitters start to go away and the acting becomes more fluid and more natural. 

    The performance ends, the final curtain goes up and the cast comes on stage to receive the reward they have so diligently earned, the appreciative round of applause from the audience. This is the reward that acknowledges another stellar performance but also thanks this committed group for providing top notch theater for the community.   

The cast list in order of appearance:

Lane (Algernon Moncreif's butler) – George Pariseau

Algernon Moncrei – Joel Perry

John (Jack) Worthing – Erik Andersen

Lady Bracknell – Deborah Williams

Miss. Gwendolyn Fairfax -Paris Engram

Miss. Cecily Cardew – Claire Holliday

Miss. Laetitia Prism – Julie Matwiiw

The Rev. Canon Dr. Chausible – Ted Eden

Merriman (John Worthing's butler) – Levi Anderson

Directed by: Don Berner and Ted Eden

    The Importance of Being Earnest is written by Oscar Wilde and was first performed in 1895. It is a satire on Victorian society, and a romantic comedy. The Importance of Being Earnest is a classic comedy of manners in which two flippant young men; in order to impress their respected beloveds, pretend that their names are "Ernest," which both young ladies believe confers magical qualities on the possessor.

    Tickets are $15 each and are available at Dr. Dave Hewko's, Warren's Music, The Best Western Inn, or by calling the Theatre Hotline at 780-352-8383. Friday and Saturday performances begin at 8 p.m. with doors opening at 7:15 p.m. Sunday performances are at 2 p.m. with doors opening at 1:15 p.m.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

City of Wetaskiwin Mayor presenting the AUMA Above & Beyond Award to John Maude and Susan Quinn. Ren Goode/ City of Wetaskiwin.
Wetaskiwin County residents win the AUMA Above & Beyond Award

John Maude and Susan Quinn are being recognized for their role in Wetaskiwin’s sustainability.

Alberta children whose only symptom of COVID-19 is a runny nose or a sore throat will no longer require mandatory isolation, starting Monday.
477 new COVID-19 cases confirmed in Alberta on Thursday

Changes being made to the COVID-19 symptom list for school-age children

There were 410 COVID-19 cases recorded in Alberta Wednesday. (File photo)
Alberta records 410 COVID-19 cases Wednesday

Central zone dropped to 160 active cases

Shaun Isaac, owner of Woodchucker Firewood in Trochu, is awaiting a new shipment during a firewood shortage in the province. All of the wood he has left is being saved for long-time customers who need it to heat their homes. (Contributed photo).
Firewood shortage in central Alberta caused by rising demand, gaps in supply

‘I’ve said “No” to more people than ever’: firewood seller

file photo
Maskwacis RCMP investigate pedestrian fatality

Collision on Highway 2A causing fatality still under investigation.

Conservative leader Erin O’Toole rises during Question Period in the House of Commons in Ottawa on Wednesday October 28, 2020. (Adrian Wyld/The Canadian Press)
Conversion therapy ban gets approval in principle, exposes Conservative divisions

Erin O’Toole himself voted in favour of the bill, as did most Conservative MPs

Pilots Ilona Carter and Jim Gray of iRecover Treatment Centres, in front of his company’s aircraft, based at Ponoka’s airport. (Perry Wilson/Submitted)
95-year-old Ilona Carter flies again

Takes to the skies over Ponoka

Children’s backpacks and shoes are seen at a daycare in Langley, B.C., on Tuesday May 29, 2018. Alberta Children’s Services Minister Rebecca Schulz says the province plans to bring in a new way of licensing and monitoring child-care facilities. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
Alberta proposes legislation to change rules on child-care spaces

Record-keeping, traditionally done on paper, would be allowed digitally

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau shakes hands with US Vice-President Joe Biden on Parliament Hill in Ottawa on Friday, December 9, 2016. THE CANADIAN PRESS/ Patrick Doyle
A Biden presidency could mean good news for Canadian environment policy: observers

Experts and observers say even a U.S. outside the Paris agreement may ultimately end up in the same place

People take a photo together during the opening night of Christmas Lights Across Canada, in Ottawa, on Wednesday, Dec. 4, 2019. The likelihood that most Canadians will enjoy a holly jolly Christmas season of gatherings, caroling and travel is unlikely, say public health experts who encourage those who revel in holiday traditions to accept more sacrifices ahead. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Ho, ho, no: Experts advise preparing for a scaled-back COVID holiday season

Many of the holiday season’s highlights have already been scrapped or are unlikely to take place

Sen. Kim Pate is shown in Toronto in an October 15, 2013, file photo. The parliamentary budget office says a proposed law that would give judges discretion on whether to apply a lesser sentence for murder could save the federal government $8.3 million per year. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Colin Perkel
Judicial discretion for mandatory minimum sentences for murder would save $8.3M: PBO

The result would be fewer people in long-term custody at federal correctional institutions, experts say

Husky Energy logo is shown at the company’s annual meeting in Calgary on May 5, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Husky pipeline spills 900,000 litres of produced water in northwestern Alberta

The energy regulator says environmental contractors are at the site

Most Read