Is Wi-Fi in Schools Safe?

Pipestone Flyer

A few weeks ago we reported about the trend to replace hard covered textbooks with online books that can be downloaded to a tablet. One of our readers was kind enough to send us a YouTube site that was a copy of a Global TV’s16 by 9 broadcast called Wi-Fi in schools proven dangerous. 

    The program examined the physical effects that Wi-Fi radio waves have on humans, particularly children. The conclusion was that there seems to be a growing concern of an increase in what many doctors are referring to as “brain fog”. This is particularly becoming common among students. Brain fog is an increase in headaches, heart palpitations, nausea, and vertigo.  These symptoms seem to increase the closer one is to the source of Wi-Fi radio waves.

    Currently the majority of research on the subject tends to support Wi-Fi advocates as to its safety, but those who are concerned generally show that those who have a vested interest in the use of Wi-Fi support much of that research.  Some have indicated that the individuals that are suffering “brain fog” symptoms and looking at Wi-Fi as the cause are experiencing what is called the “nocebo” effect. This is when one thinks negatively about something it results in negative physical outcomes.

    One experiment, reported in the April 3, 2013 issue of the New Yorker Magazine, reported that in a blind test of those who saw a video on the dangers of Wi-Fi and another group who saw a video on mobile security questioned the effects of Wi-Fi on the human condition. After exposure to the videos they were then, individually, placed in a room and asked to push a button that turned on a Wi-Fi amplifier and wait fifteen minutes. Those that had been exposed to the video on the dangers of Wi-Fi began to indicate they had tingling in their feet, hands and fingers as well having trouble concentrating. Two subjects were so uncomfortable that they stopped the experiment. The problem with their reaction was that the Wi-Fi was NEVER turned on!

    Currently similar negative physical effects have been reported with the increase in areas where wind-turbines have been installed.

    This is not to discount the concerns that have been raised. We have all come to realize that various individuals react differently to our environment and it is only in recent years we have come to accept what smoking does to the body and even more recently have recognized the need to change our habits regarding peanuts and perfume in order to protect those who react negatively to those items.

    The question is Wi-Fi safe in schools is still in need of additional research and school divisions wanting to become Wi-Fi schools should proceed with caution.  They do not need Wi-Fi to download textbooks to tablets and hardwired schools do avoid the concerns raised by being a Wi-Fi zone.

    Kind of makes you wonder about the various restaurants and hotels that have established Wi-Fi zones? 

 

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