Second Book for Local Author

Pipestone Flyer

Almost seven months since her first book, Captured Lies, was published online, Millet author Glenna Mageau is now celebrating her second book’s release.

    Her new book, Tainted Waters, officially came out yesterday and is now available as an ebook on several popular websites, including Amazon, iTunes and Kobo.

    Tainted Waters, is a murder-mystery that follows the story of the main character, Sam, who is frustrated after being fired from her latest job and is overwhelmed by her consolatory family. Sam then decides to move to the family’s cabin at the lake. A place she hasn’t been since her dad had committed suicide there twenty years before. Or did he? Snooping is something she’s good at but someone seems to be taking offense to her looking too closely at what has been happening at the lake.

    With the success Mageau’s first book, Captured Lies, has found online, the local author is now looking forward to seeing how her second book fares.

    “I (was) really excited about the book coming out,” she said in an interview with the Pipestone Flyer, prior to the book’s official launch. “But I’m nervous too because there has been such a positive reaction to Captured Lies, I’m worried is this going to be as good?”

    While Tainted Waters is not a sequel to her first book, Mageau, who goes by the pen name, Maggie Thom, said that the genres are the same. 

    “It is very different from the first book. It is the same suspense style, but a very different story,” she said.

What many people might not realize is that Mageau is not only responsible for writing the books, but publishing and marketing as well. 

    She spends a lot of her time on social media, whether it be on Facebook, Twitter, or her own website, she is always meeting new people and attempting to get the word out about her books. But the author says she is careful about how much time she spends online in any given day.

    “I worked as a manager for 24 years and it overtook my life. Now, I try to be really cautious and keep it to 8 a.m. to 4 p.m., when my family isn’t home. I’m really trying to keep it separate (from my home life) so I’ll start working first thing in the morning when no one is around,” she explained. “I work Monday to Friday like any work day. “Funny, before this I wasn’t huge on social media, but when you do something like this, you realize how huge of a resource it can be,” she added. “It’s been a cool journey. I’ve met a lot of great people and other authors.”

    Mageau has her own blog that she updates regularly. Last winter, as a way to promote her first book, Mageau went on a “blog tour” guest writing on several other people’s blogs.

    “I think the blog tour was a great idea,” she said. “I think it made a big difference.”

    For promotion of her second novel, Mageau has hired a street team to work with her on creating hype and awareness of her works of fiction.

    “It’s something new I’m trying…I’m really impressed with the team I’ve got.”

    So what is next for the author? Mageau has begun work on the sequel to Captured Lies and hopes to have that book out later this fall.

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