Bonnie Quast and her daughter created paper Easter eggs to display to the community from their window. Photo submitted by Bonnie Quast.

Bonnie Quast and her daughter created paper Easter eggs to display to the community from their window. Photo submitted by Bonnie Quast.

The social distancing Easter egg hunt

Some families are getting crafty in self-isolation

With families either limiting their time outside of the house, or completely quarantined in self-isolation, many parents are looking for activities to keep their kids occupied.

One trend that has been taking off not only locally, but internationally is the isolation Easter Egg hunt. Communities across Canada and the USA are trying to keep social distancing spirits bright by starting Easter a little early.

A Facebook group with over 70 thousand members is sharing creative ways to make crafted Easter eggs to hang from windows and doors, a way to keep community activity alive from a safe distance. With the intent to keep community spirits up, and to allow families to participate in social distancing with a fun twist the “Easter Egg Hunt 2020 With Social Distancing” page was born.

The main goal of the Easter eggs, rather than other creative crafts in the window, is a way for families to go for social distancing walks or for a drive to ‘collect’ or spot Easter eggs around their neighborhood.

With hundreds of Easter egg colouring page templates being shared, as well as creative stained glass window art ideas, people are banding together to share colourful and fun pops of personality with their community from the safety of their own homes.

Wetaskiwin mom, Bonnie Quast thinks the Facebook page is great.

“It gives kids a chance to get engaged while not in school,” Quast says, “it gives us something to do and something to look forward to.”

Quast and her three-year-old daughter have enjoyed crafting the Easter eggs lately and taking their minds off the more stressful aspects of social-distancing. “We have made some construction paper Easter eggs and put them in the window,” she says.

Quast is also thinking about painting one of her front windows to spread more joy for her busy street, as well as creating clay Easter eggs to hide around the city for more families to enjoy and have fun with while taking walks as they socially-distance.

Quast thinks it’s fantastic that this page and its crafting ideas are not only taking off in the community, but world-wide.

“It is a little lightness in this dark time,” she says.

Community