Three Women Are Technically Twisted At Reynolds Museum Metal Art Show & Sale

Pipestone Flyer

On September 20th and 21st, among the displays of antique machinery and cars at the Reynolds Alberta Museum, were displays of stunning jewelry, custom knives, chainmail, steam punk, and sculptures; creations from sterling silver, copper and Damascus Steel.

Among the exhibitors was a ‘family affair’. Mom, Susan Marasco, and daughters Emily Marasco and Kaitlin Marasco from Calgary, Alberta were displaying and explaining to viewers their unique jewelry design that represents steampunk genre. Emily explained, “Steampunk is a science fiction sub-genre that reimagines life where steam-powered machinery meets futuristic inventions. The most common steampunk themes feature Victorian era fashions and accessories outfitted with gears, pistons, and wheels.”

Emily and Kaitlin were first introduced to the steampunk genre when they joined their younger brother as volunteers for the 2011 Calgary Comic and Entertainment Expo. They instantly fell in love with the beauty and ingenuity of the genre and saw potential for inventing unique jewelry designs. For the next year, this mother-daughter- daughter team worked hard to combine their years of experience creating jewelry and accessories into a thriving business, and Technically Twisted Studios was born.

In the past few years, Technically Twisted has expanded their products to include beaded and gemstone jewelry, and in 2014 they launched a secondary line of fantasy themed accessories under the banner ‘Realm of Enchantments’.

Why are these three women Technically Twisted? Somehow you don’t really expect a secondary school math teacher (Susan the Mom), a PhD student in electrical engineering, focusing on the connections between creativity and engineering design (daughter Emily) and a Masters student in zoology with a passion for animals and health (daughter Kaitlin) coming together to form a company that makes and sells jewelry. But that is exactly what happened. Officially launched in early 2012, Technically Twisted is a mother-daughter-daughter team that takes decades of art, crafting and jewelry experience and creates authentic jewelry pieces that they share with fans.

Although interests and education patterns seem very diverse, digging a little deeper reveals the common interest, jewelry. Susan (Mom) has been creating jewelry, crafts, and art her entire life. She is a talented painter and seamstress who always made sure her children had the most stunning Halloween costumes in school. Susan is experienced in fibre arts, including weaving and spinning.

Emily, the PhD student in electrical engineering, has a passion for interdisciplinary connections between math, science and fine arts which has influenced her process for designing jewelry. Emily specializes in beadwork, and is also learning how to facet gemstones.

Finally, Kaitlin the Masters student in zoology, is a talented artist, capable of capturing her imagination through both paper and digital forms. Kaitlin specializes in wearable sculpture, and is also the lead for Technically Twisted’s development of a new accessory line for pets.

“The members of the Marasco family have been visiting museums, art galleries, and aquariums for as long as Kaitlin and I can remember,” is one of the reasons Emily found the Reynolds Alberta Museum such a welcoming venue. “Where some families would spend their weekends skiing or swimming, the Marascos could be found exploring the mysteries of history, art, nature, and archeology. The Reynolds-Alberta Museum is a favourite of Susan’s father, and the family first visited the exhibits together years ago. We are delighted to return to Wetaskiwin with our jewelry to be a part of this fascinating museum event.”

Reynolds Alberta Museum is to be commended for hosting this event that drew exhibitors and visitors from across Western Canada.

For more information about Technically Twisted, go to: http://technicallytwistedstudios.wordpress.com/

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