Innisfail resident Laurie Miller said she does not want to see more rail cars moving oil across the province. She also said the federal government needs to value Alberta’s natural resource sector. Robin Grant/Red Deer Express

Yellow Vests protesters take to Red Deer streets

Trudeau government’s immigration and oil industry policies denounced at rally

The policies of Prime Minister Justin Trudeau were the ire of the protesters at a Yellow Vests Canada rally outside Red Deer City Hall Saturday morning.

More than 100 protesters came out, many holding signs expressing discontent with the current government. Some read: “Stop Trudeau,” “Wake up Canada” and “Trudeau is a Traitor.”

They were met by commuters who honked their horns in support as they drove along 48th St.

Members of the Yellow Vests movement in Canada believe the federal Liberal government is failing Canadians because of its immigration policies and the plan to endorse United Nations’ migration pact, a 36-page document that outlines goals for treating global migrants humanely and efficiently. They also criticize how the prime minister is addressing the current oil crisis in Alberta, the carbon tax and what they consider a failure to create job security.

The movement is inspired by the protests taking place in France right now that object to the country’s high cost of living, income inequality and President Emmanuel Macron.

Dave, who did not give his last name, believes the Trudeau government is ‘killing the country.’ He said he worked in Alberta’s oil industry, “Until there were no jobs.

“It’s going to be the demise of Canada,” he said. “We need a pipeline built — that’s another big thing. The government is killing the country. Not just Alberta. Trudeau’s idea is if he can break the country then he can turn it over to a communist state, and that is what he is working towards.”

He also disapproved of the federal government’s immigration policies.

“He is giving all the authority to all the Muslims. He is going to bring in Sharia Law and that will be the end of the Canadian people. He is buying votes at our dollar.”

Innisfail resident Laurie Miller said she believes the federal government is doing very little to promote the oil industry in Alberta.

“We need to promote our own natural resources,” she said. “We are important and we are an integral part of this country — not just this province. Oil and gas are important.”

Miller said she also disapproves of Premier Rachel Notley’s proposal to buy rail cars to move oil to help close the huge price gaps in oil.

“I live in Innisfail and the rails are overloaded already,” she said. “The trains come non-stop, multiple times an hour and at huge speeds and at lengths that we’ve never had to wait before. So it is critical that this above ground movement stops with our natural resources. Absolutely.”

Debbie K. called Trudeau a traitor to Canada.

“He has signed our sovereignty away to the United Nations with no referendum. It’s totally against the wishes of the Canadian people,” she said. “The whole Trudeau government should be charged with treason.”

“We’re not against immigration. We’re against not being asked who we want for immigration and having the U.N. decide who gets to come in. Not Canadians deciding,” said one man.

Shane Walper, an oil industry worker in the province, said the way Canada extracts oil is one of the most environmentally sound in the world.

“I’ve had the luxury of travelling to various countries around the globe and got to witness their oil and gas operations and none even come close to the way we do it in Canada.

“When the price of oil is driven down so low the operators can’t afford it. They are losing money on every producing barrel so they shut down, they stop investment. And that is what we have seen over the last number of years. Just a decline in the overall investment coming into this country.”

“It is very sad that Justin Trudeau is alienating his own citizens,” said Gladys Weiland. “He is supposed to work for us — not us work for him and that is what he wants. He wants to lock us up and say, ‘Ha! Got you were I want ya!’ He needs to leave. He needs to go.”

The Yellow Vests protest was one of several taking place across Canada in recent weeks.

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