Photo/ Metro Creative Connection

Photo/ Metro Creative Connection

Heat warning in effect across the County of Wetaskiwin

Water restrictions in place across the City of Wetaskiwin and Town of Millet.

Environment Canada has issued a heat warning for this week, which is in effect for the County of Wetaskiwin including Millet and parts of Highway 2.

“A prolonged, dangerous, and historic heat wave will persist through this week,” says Environment Canada on their website. “The heat wave will continue into early next week for some regions.”

Little to no reprieve from the heat is expected when the sun goes down however, as overnight lows will remain between 15 and 25 degrees Celsius.

“The duration and magnitude of this heat event will lead to increased risk of heat related illness.”

Residents and visitors of the regions under the heat warning are advised to consider rescheduling outdoor activities to cooler hours of the day, take frequent breaks from the heat to spend time in cooled indoor spaces where possible, and drink plenty of water and other non-alcoholic, non-caffeinated beverages to stay hydrated.

Environment Canada is also reminding everyone to check for children or pets before you leave your vehicle as they should not be left inside a closed vehicle for any length of time.

Due to the heat wave, the City of Wetaskiwin currently has a stage 1 water restriction in place to conserve water resources and the Town of Millet has also implemented a water restriction.

READ MORE: Water restriction in place for the City of Wetaskiwin

Residents are asked to try and avoid washing vehicles, driveways, and home exteriors at this time and odd number addresses are asked to only water on odd days and even number addresses on even days.

As of 1:00 p.m. on June 28, 2021, the Millet Splash Park will also be closed until further notice as part of the water restriction.

During the heat wave it is important to monitor for symptoms of heat stroke or heat exhaustion, such as high body temperature, lack of sweat, confusion, fainting, and unconsciousness.

Heat warnings are issued when very high temperature conditions are expected to pose an elevated risk of heat illnesses, such as heat stroke or heat exhaustion.

Symptoms of heat exhaustion include:

• Headache;

• Dizzy or fainting;

• Heavy sweating;

• Cold, pale, and clammy skin;

• Nausea or vomiting;

• Fast, weak pulse;

• Weakness or muscle cramps;

• Excessive thirst.

What to do if you have symptoms of heat exhaustion:

• Hydrate with water or a sports drink, no alcohol;

• Move to a cooler, air-conditioned place;

• Lie down;

• If fully conscious, sip water;

• Take a cool shower or use cold compresses;

• If vomiting continues, seek medical attention;

• Act quickly, untreated heat exhaustion can progress to heat stroke;

• Remove tight fitting clothing or extra layers.

Symptoms of heat stroke; heat stroke is considered a medical emergency and 911 should be called immediately if you or someone you are with are experiencing symptoms of heat stroke:

• Headache;

• Confusion or delirium;

• May lose consciousness;

• No sweating/ dry skin;

• Hot, red skin;

• Nausea or vomiting;

• Rapid heart rate;

• Body temperature above 104 degrees Fahrenheit.

What to do if you have symptoms of heat stroke:

• Call 911, this is a medical emergency;

• Move the person to a cooler place;

• Use a cold compress to reduce body temperature;

• Do not give fluids.

“Pay particular attention to individuals that can experience earlier or more severe effects from heat including infants, children, seniors, and individuals with pre-existing lung, heart, kidney, nervous system, mental health or diabetic conditions, outdoor workers, as well as those who are socially isolated.”



shaela.dansereau@pipestoneflyer.ca

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