A Jan. 24 public hearing will review the two suggested scenarios for Wetaskiwin’s provincially mandated Wastewater Treatment Facility upgrade.

A Jan. 24 public hearing will review the two suggested scenarios for Wetaskiwin’s provincially mandated Wastewater Treatment Facility upgrade.

Wastewater treatment facility upgrades are coming: What should they look like?

Jan. 24 public hearing to review two options

As Wetaskiwin moves forward on its provincially mandated Wastewater Treatment Facility upgrade, the City and its partners are assessing two options for construction and operation.

A Jan. 24 public hearing will review the two suggested scenarios.

Why is the treatment facility upgrade needed?

At more than 40 years old, Wetaskiwin’s current lagoon system will not meet today’s more stringent provincial environmental requirements when its current operating approval expires in 2023.

Essentially, today’s regulations require a higher level of wastewater treatment than what was in place when the current system was built, so the City must upgrade its Wastewater Treatment Facility to comply with provincial regulations.

In anticipation of the mandated upgrade, City Council approved $1 million in 2019 for a detailed design of the new treatment facility, whose construction is estimated to cost between $40 and $53 million, and has pursued cost-sharing options with the federal and provincial governments.

Graham Capital will provide construction, financing, operations and maintenance services for the new facility, allowing the city to meet the required effluent regulations while reducing the financial burden on ratepayers. Once built, ownership will remain with the City and the facility will be operated as a Municipally Controlled Corporation.

Two options are available for construction. The recommended option – Scenario 2 – estimates the cost at $53 million to complete the comprehensive upgrades as a single work program. Scenario 1 costs less at approximately $40.2 million, but would spread the required work over several stages, deferring renewal work to minimize initial capital costs.

While Scenario 2 has a higher initial construction cost, its annualized cost is lower—at $9.75 million compared to Scenario 1’s $11.7 million. Scenario 2 also has a lower projected operations and maintenance cost due to quality equipment and facilities, leading to reduced intervention and repair, plus consistent utility rates for consumers.

Learn more at the January public hearing

The City is hosting a public hearing into the Water Treatment Facility, beginning at 1 p.m. on Jan. 24, 2022.

Written or verbal submissions will be heard by Council during the public hearing. Written submissions may be mailed to the City of Wetaskiwin at PO Box 6210, Wetaskiwin AB, T9A 2E9; faxed to 780-361-4402 prior to 4:30 p.m. Jan. 21, 2022; or emailed to sue.howard@wetaskiwin.ca.

Submissions will be included on the Council agenda.

To learn more, visit whatifwetaskiwin.ca/wastewater-treatment-facility

Wetaskiwin