Country residential land rezoned for clay extraction

A section of land — 2.02 hectares — was approved for rezoning from county residential to direct control to allow for the landowners...

A section of land 2.02 hectares was approved for rezoning from county residential to direct control to allow for the landowners to stabilize a bank that was compromised during a clay extraction project during the 1970s.

All three readings were given during council’s June 28 meeting; Coun. Clay Stumph was opposed to all three readings but voted in favor of the motion to take the matter to the third and final reading so it could be dealt all on the same day.

The purpose of the rezoning is for land reclamation and clay extraction. Landowner Shayne Schultz made a small presentation during council’s meeting and said the intent is to cut the underlying clay and apply top soil to lessen the slope of the bank, making it more suitable for agriculture and other land uses.

Schultz told council the clay pit used to extend further than it does now but much of the land has already been reclaimed. “This is the final to finally get it extracted and get it back to usable.”

Coun. Tanni Doblanko questioned how many trucks per day the site would see and was informed by planner Doug Woodliffe it would be no more than 100 trucks per day, which is why the project could take up to two years.

County administration supported the rezoning and suggested the project would have no negative affect on county roads. The site is along Rollyview Road and Range Road 244.

The property is part of the Saunders Lake Area Structure Plan, which identifies land for county residential use. Administration recommended the landowner redistrict the land back to county residential upon project completion.

However, it was considered to be an unnecessary expense for the landowner and will remain direct control until another application for deliberate rezoning comes to council.

Crossroads area structure plan

Leduc County council approved the rezoning of approximately 51 hectares of agricultural land to industrial business district and light industrial district.

The purpose of the amendment is to support the implementation of the Crossroads Area Structure Plan for Capital Corridor Developments Ltd, along Highway 2.

During their meeting councillors rescinded a first reading previously approved in December 2011 to allow for amendments.

“I understand the need to grow along the highway, but it’s a sad day when we redistrict ag land,” said Coun. Tanni Doblanko.

 

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