Do You Own a Heritage Quilt?

Quilt documentation day coming soon, so don't miss this chance.

  • Aug. 5, 2015 8:00 a.m.
WARM AND COMFY - The Wetaskiwin & District Heritage Museum wishes to continue to document heritage quilts made in Alberta or brought as part of the migration to Alberta.

WARM AND COMFY - The Wetaskiwin & District Heritage Museum wishes to continue to document heritage quilts made in Alberta or brought as part of the migration to Alberta.

The Wetaskiwin & District Heritage Museum is pleased to announce that former Museum Manager Lucie Heins (now the Assistant Curator, Western Canadian History at the Royal Alberta Museum) is returning for a public Quilt Documentation Day on Tuesday, August 18 from 10 p.m. to 4 p.m. This is an opportunity to have your family quilt(s) documented and photographed (at no cost to you) in order to preserve its history and contribution to Alberta’s quilting history. Lucie and her team will look at the techniques and materials used to make your quilt. They will also try to collect as much history as possible. If you don’t know the age of your quilt, they will be able to give you an approximate date. Only pre-1970 quilts will be considered at this time unless a heritage quilt top was finished after 1970.

The Western Canadian History Program at the Royal Alberta Museum has been working on an Alberta Craft Research Initiative to document the material culture of craft production within the Alberta context. The Alberta Quilt Project, a component of this research initiative, looks at contemporary quilts made in Alberta over the last 25 years and heritage quilts made in Alberta or brought by immigrants to Alberta. As the Alberta Quilt Project proceeds, it is hoped that this research will help tell the Alberta quilting story. Most history books written about quilts in Canada are about quilts in eastern Canada. It is time to change that. The information captured through the quilt documentation events and interviews will help to capture that history. If you own a heritage or family quilt made in Alberta or as part of the immigrant story to Alberta, it may be a good candidate.

The Heritage Museum’s Executive Director Karen Aberle believes that “this is an important event, both for the museum and for Wetaskiwin. It allows us to welcome Lucie home and, much like a quilt itself, to join individual pieces from our community, as well as all of Alberta, so that together we can all help to tell the story of our cultural heritage.” If you would like more information about the event, or to book a time to have your quilt(s) documented, please contact Karen at 780-352-0227. If you wish more information about the Alberta Quilt Project contact Lucie Heins at 780-453-9176 or lucie.heins@gov.ab.ca.

History of the Project

Phase I of the Alberta Quilt Project, documenting 21st century Alberta quilters, was completed during the first two and a half years of the project. In order to truly capture Alberta quilters today, it was necessary that as many quilters as possible participate in a survey. More than 600 quilters have completed a very detailed survey questionnaire. The results have been analyzed and there is no doubt that quilting trends today differ from quilting trends 100 years ago. There is also great diversity in the types of quilts made today, from traditional to contemporary art pieces. The results of the project were shared with Alberta quilters in almost 30 different communities throughout Alberta from as far south as Etzikom and Lethbridge and as far north as Grand Prairie and Peace River.

This is a unique project because most documentation projects focus specifically on heritage quilts. In 50 or 100 years from now, material culture historians will be thrilled that Alberta quilting trends were captured at this time. Alberta quilters are making their own history today although for most of us it is just an everyday existence. We rarely think of today as history because it is the present. Alberta quilters should know that they are pioneers in this new and innovative research.

Phase II, a five year project, is in its third year. We wish to continue to document heritage quilts made in Alberta or brought as part of the migration to Alberta. Our goal is to document and photograph quilts found in regional museums as well as in private collections throughout Alberta. This documentation allows us to see the different kind of quilts made during different decades, the materials and the patterns used to create them. This will help us capture trends by regions if any. All of the information retrieved will reside in the Royal Alberta Museum.

 

Just Posted

(Advocate file photo)
Red Deer down to 102 active COVID-19 cases

Central zone has 332 cases with 26 in hospital and five in ICU

Storm clouds gathered in Mulhurst, Alta., just before noon June 15, 2021. Photo/ Dan Moster.
Areas of County of Wetaskiwin remain under severe thunderstorm watch

Environment Canada has issued a severe thunderstorm watch for areas of the County.

Maskwacis Pride crosswalk (Left to right): Montana First Nation Councillor Reggie Rabbit, Samson Cree Nation Councillor Louise Omeasoo, Samson Cree Nation Councillor Katherine Swampy, Samson Cree Nation Councillor Shannon Buffalo, Samson Cree Nation Chief Vern Saddleback.
Pride in Maskwacis

The 4th inaugural Maskwacis Pride crosswalk painting took place on Saturday June 12th, 2021

The Government of Alberta identified 115 new COVID-19 cases Sunday, bringing the provincial total to 3,089.
(Black Press file photo)
Red Deer COVID cases continue to fall

114 cases in Red Deer, down one from Saturday

Manluk Centre/ Impress
Manluk Centre re-opens to the public

Drop in and registered programs will be available; one-third facility capacity to be followed.

People watch a car burn during a riot following game 7 of the NHL Stanley Cup final in downtown Vancouver, B.C., in this June 15, 2011 photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Geoff Howe
10 years ago: Where were you during the 2011 Vancouver Stanley Cup Riots?

Smashed-in storefronts, looting, garbage can fires and overturned cars some of the damage remembered today

(Black Press Media file)
Dirty money: Canadian currency the most germ-filled in the world, survey suggests

Canadian plastic currency was found to contain 209 bacterial cultures

A worker, at left, tends to a customer at a cosmetics shop amid the COVID-19 pandemic Thursday, May 20, 2021, in Los Angeles. (AP Photo/Marcio Jose Sanchez)
Half of cosmetics sold in Canada, U.S. contain toxic chemicals: study

Researchers tested more than 230 commonly used cosmetics and found that 56% of foundations and eye products, 48% of lip products and 47% of mascaras contained high levels of fluorine

Annamie Paul, leader of the Green Party of Canada, speaks at a news conference on Parliament Hill in Ottawa, on June 10, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Justin Tang
Green Leader Annamie Paul facing no-confidence motion from party brass

move follows months of internal strife and the defection of MP Jenica Atwin to the Liberals

Tulips bloom in front of the Supreme Court of Canada in Ottawa, Thursday, May 10, 2018. Day two of a full week of scheduled hearings will be heard in Federal Court today on a case involving Indigenous children unnecessarily taken into foster care by what all parties call Canada’s “broken child welfare system.” THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
AFN slams Ottawa for ‘heartless’ legal challenge of First Nations child compensation

2019 decision awarded $40,000 to each Indigenous child removed before 2006

A health-care worker holds up a sign signalling she needs more COVID-19 vaccines at the ‘hockey hub’ mass vaccination facility at the CAA Centre during the COVID-19 pandemic in Brampton, Ont., on Friday, June 4, 2021. This NHL-sized hockey rink is one of CanadaÕs largest vaccination centres. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
‘Vaxxed to the max’: Feds launch Ask an Expert campaign to encourage COVID shots

Survey shows that confidence in vaccines has risen this spring

Children’s shoes and flowers are shown after being placed outside the Ontario legislature in Toronto on Monday, May 31, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Frank Gunn
Ontario commits $10 million to investigate burial sites at residential schools

Truth and Reconciliation Commission identified 12 locations of unmarked burial sites in Ontario

Two hundred and fifteen lights are placed on the lawn outside the Residential School in Kamloops, B.C., Saturday, June, 13, 2021. The remains of 215 children were discovered buried near the former Kamloops Indian Residential School earlier this month. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jonathan Hayward
Days after Kamloops remains discovery, Tk’emlups families gather to unite, move ahead

‘We have to work together because this is going to be setting a precedent for the rest of the country’

In this Saturday, May 29, 2021, file photo, people crowd the Santa Monica Pier in Santa Monica, Calif. California, the first state in America to put in place a coronavirus lockdown, is now turning a page on the pandemic. Most of California’s coronavirus restrictions will disappear Tuesday, June 15, 2021. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
With COVID tamed, it’s a ‘grand reopening’ in California

No more state rules on social distancing, no more limits on capacity, no more mandatory masks

Most Read