Green Party offering an alternative

Joy-Ann Hut is running as the MP candidate for the Green Party of Canada, a journey completely new and different for her.

Green Party candidate Jo-Ann Hut

Green Party candidate Jo-Ann Hut

Joy-Ann Hut is running as the MP candidate for the Green Party of Canada, a journey completely new and different for her.

“I have never run on any level of political action before,” said Hut.

Hut’s son was diagnosed with autism two years ago, which may have started the spark leading up to the moment he threw herself into the race. “Of course that’s when an individual becomes a great advocate for things.”

Hut says she is quite concerned on a number of social issues and the environment and the number of growing chemicals used in everyday life is a big one for her.

Hut had contacted a number of MPs and was dissatisfied with the response she got. However, Valerie Kennedy, Hut’s own MP contact before the electoral border changes, visited her to speak about the issue.

“She, in her own subtle way, informed me about the border changes and the Green Party would need my support as much as I need theirs,” said Hut.

Hut says she did not jump on the idea of running for MP right away. “It was daunting.”

However, she is pleased with the no-whip structure of the Green Party. “You don’t just vote with the party, you’re always engaging your community for their input.”

Hut feels what sets her apart from other candidates is her open-mindedness and ability to listen. “I’m here to represent this community and hear them out.”

“I want to hear from the critics,” she added. Hut feels by listening to every side is how the strongest policies and greatest progress will be achieved.

Security is the biggest issue Hut has taken throughout the campaign. She refers to Bill C-51, which is the government’s reaction to what it feels its reaction should be to protect the county from terrorists, says Hut.

She feels it may have been drafted with good intentions but the vague wording could prove detrimental in the future. Hut adds the bill may not be applicable in the future, with its current wording, as the definition of terrorist evolves.

“There’s this generic way of vilifying someone you don’t really care for,” said Hut.

“Does this thing actually make us safer,” she added.