Albert Huynh, right, tosses water at Leanne Opuyes as they cool off in the frigid Lynn Creek water in North Vancouver, B.C., on Monday, June 28, 2021. Environment Canada has issued heat warnings and special weather statements as unseasonable temperatures return to parts of B.C. and the Prairies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Albert Huynh, right, tosses water at Leanne Opuyes as they cool off in the frigid Lynn Creek water in North Vancouver, B.C., on Monday, June 28, 2021. Environment Canada has issued heat warnings and special weather statements as unseasonable temperatures return to parts of B.C. and the Prairies. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck

Heat warnings, special weather statements issued for parts of Western Canada

Temperatures not expected to reach record-breaking heights of a few weeks ago

Environment Canada has issued heat warnings and special weather statements as unseasonable temperatures return to parts of British Columbia and the Prairies.

Heat warnings call for temperatures in the low to mid-30s for southern Alberta and southwestern Manitoba and nudging to 40 C in areas of southern Saskatchewan, before easing slightly later in the week.

Special weather statements are posted across most of southern B.C. and Vancouver Island, but Environment Canada says they could be upgraded to warnings as conditions peak between Wednesday and Saturday.

Heat in the mid- to high-30s is expected with the highest temperatures slated for Thompson-Okanagan, the southern Kootenays and Fraser Canyon — all areas where aggressive wildfires continue to burn.

Forecasters say conditions will not be as hot as late June, when temperature records shattered across Western Canada and the B.C. coroner determined sweltering conditions caused hundreds of deaths.

Wildfire smoke has also led to air quality advisories for most of southern B.C., southwestern Alberta and a large part of Manitoba, prompting a warning for seniors, young children and anyone with heart or lung conditions to avoid exposure.

—The Canadian Press

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