Is This The Year?

  • Apr. 16, 2015 3:00 p.m.

Pipestone Flyer

    In 1967 when we arrived in Alberta to begin a teaching career, the party in power was the Social Credit. They had been in power since 1935 and would hold on until 1971 when the Progressive Conservatives (PCs) led by Peter Lougheed came to power. We were amazed how a party holding 55 out of 65 seats in 1968 could be reduced to just 4 seats three years later. When Albertans decided to change government they did it whole heartily and their loyalty to the Progressive Conservatives was complete and total.

    Since 1971 the Progressive Conservatives have enjoyed that support surpassing the 36-year hold of the Social Credit, making the party the longest unbroken run in government, at the provincial level, in Canadian history! Along the way the PC Party had some help when Trudeau’s National Energy Program made Liberals as rare as chicken teeth in Alberta, and then the untimely death of Grant Notley set back the NDP and left the opposition in disarray. 

    Every time the PC party looked like it would falter the party was able to find a leader that could connect with citizens. Ralph Klein, who talks to Martha and Henry, rekindles the grassroots support for the PC Party and replaces Don Getty. Just when it looked like the PCs would stumble, Alison Redford leads them to a stunning victory in 2012. Less than two years later Redford is gone and Jim Prentice is the new leader. While the Wildrose looked to be on the verge of becoming Alberta’s new voice they are shut out in four by-elections and a month later are in disarray as two-thirds of the Wildrose members walk across the floor to join the PC Party. 

    With tough times approaching Alberta, Prentice goes to the public for a new mandate. With three of Alberta’s political parties recently appointing new leaders his timing appears to be taking advantage of their leaders inexperience. Will it work?

    Many Albertans are annoyed. They wonder why a law was passed that established the setting of election dates has been ignored. They are annoyed that the new budget leaves much to be desired regarding fairness in tax increases. They are annoyed that millions of dollars are needed on, what they consider, a needless election.  

    Will this be the year that Alberta voters decide to change the government? Recent polls seem to show that Albertans want a change but are not sure what that change should look like. In Edmonton the NDP seems to be making inroads while the Wildrose has continue to appeal to the rural areas of the province. Even the Alberta Party has drawn some interest. These polls have also shown a high percentage of undecided voters. This could result in a very low voter turn out or a sudden swing in last minute voters deciding where they want to park their vote.

    Provincial MLA candidates for Leduc-Beaumont will be present at the Leduc Regional Chamber of Commerce’s Candidates Forum on April 30th beginning at 7:30pm at the Maclab Centre for the Performing Arts. Doors open at 6:30pm.

    This will be the second forum hosted by the Chamber and hopefully all the candidates running in Leduc-Beaumont will be in attendance.

    MLA George Rogers is seeking re-election as a member of the PC Party while Shayne Anderson of the NDP Party, Sharon Smith of the Wildrose, John Stewart of the Alberta Party, and Josh Drozda from the Green Party are running in opposition.

    The number of candidates makes for an interesting election and we can all be thankful that Alberta’s election processes is measured in weeks and not years like in the United States. 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Health Minister Tyler Shandro said Thursday that the province was ready to move forward with Phase 2A and B in the coming weeks. (Photo by Paul Taillon/Office of the Premier)
COVID restrictions for retail, sports and performers further eased

Occupancy in stores and malls boosted to 25 per cent from 15 per cent

Advocate file image
Red Deer COVID cases continue to decline

249 cases in Red Deer, down from 565 peak on Feb. 22

A SAGA member (left) poses as Jessi Hanks (right) with Castle Restaurant puts up a safe space sticker to display on the restaurant’s front door. Shaela Dansereau/ Pipestone Flyer.
SAGA Wetaskiwin works with local businesses to display they are a safe space

The safe space stickers show that its a safe and inclusive space.

File photo
Gov’t of Alberta identifies estimated 300 new COVID-19 cases Sunday

Online COVID-19 dashboard unavailable as upgrades being completed

(The Canadian Press)
‘Worse than Sept. 11, SARS and financial crisis combined’: Tourism industry in crisis

Travel services saw the biggest drop in active businesses with 31 per cent fewer firms operating

David and Collet Stephan leave for a break during their appeal hearing in Calgary on Thursday, March 9, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol
Alberta Appeal Court orders 3rd trial for parents in toddler’s meningitis death

Stephans were accused of not seeking medical attention sooner for Ezekiel, who had meningitis when he died

A health-care worker prepares a dose of the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine at a UHN COVID-19 vaccine clinic in Toronto on Thursday, January 7, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Vaccine hesitancy decreases in B.C. as mass immunizations set to begin: poll

Two-thirds of British Columbians, and Canadians, would get the vaccine as soon as possible

A woman walks through Toronto’s financial district on Monday, July 30, 2018. A new poll suggests most Canadians believe there’s still a long way to go to achieve gender equality in this country. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graeme Roy
Canadians, especially women, say gender equality not achieved in Canada: Poll

Poll results themselves underscore the challenge, with more men believing equality had been achieved

This image provided by Harpo Productions shows Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, left, in conversation with Oprah Winfrey. (Joe Pugliese/Harpo Productions via AP)
Race, title and anguish: Meghan and Harry explain royal rift

Meghan said she struggled with concerns within the royal family about her son’s skin colour

Kiara Robillard is seen in an undated handout photo. When the pandemic began, Robillard had to rush back home to Alberta from California, where she had been living for five years, after she was struck by a truck that broke her spine in two places. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Kiara Robillard, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
‘It kind of clicks:’ Text4Hope program helps with depression, anxiety during pandemic

Participants receive one text message every morning for three months

Hockey hall-of-fame legend Wayne Gretzky, right, watches the casket of his father, Walter Gretzky, as it is carried from the church during a funeral service in Brantford, Ont., Saturday, March 6, 2021. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky remembered as a man with a ‘heart of gold’ at funeral

The famous hockey father died Thursday at age 82 after battling Parkinson’s disease

Supporters rally outside court as Pastor James Coates of GraceLife Church is in court to appeal bail conditions, after he was arrested for holding day services in violation of COVID-19 rules, in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday March 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
‘Law remains valid:’ Pastor accused of violating health orders to remain in jail

The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is representing the pastor

A decommissioned pumpjack is shown at a well head on an oil and gas installation near Cremona, Alta., Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016. The Alberta Energy Regulator says it is suspending all of the licences held by an oil and gas producer with more than 2,200 wells and 2,100 pipelines after it failed to bring its operations into compliance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta Energy Regulator suspends licences of oil and gas producer that owes $67M

The company is being asked to comply with past orders to clean up historic spills and contamination

Most Read