Let’s talk and I don’t care if you’ve got dementia

‘Understanding Dementia: It Affects All of Us’ workshop in Wetaskiwin May 4

Angela King

The Baby Boomers are the single biggest aging demographic in modern history, and along with that comes challenges such as the scourge of dementia. But there is hope for those living with a family member suffering from dementia.

“Understanding Dementia: It Affects All of Us” is a one-day workshop with guest speaker Angela King, chaplain for the Good Samaritan society and PAC trainer in dementia care with Teepa Snow. She said the workshop address a serious issue facing Alberta families: living with a family member who has dementia.

“We’re not prepared for it,” said King by phone Apr. 6. “It’s happening to everyone around us. No one is immune.”

She said the word “dementia” can be very scary for those unfamiliar with it, and this workshop is a practical and realistic way to learn about something that many families will have to face. “It’s for anyone in the community who’s interested,” she said.

The gist of the day will be learning how to communicate and interact with people who have dementia. Participants will learn new skills that they can take away with them and practice, skills that are simple but require attention.

King said those with dementia don’t know their condition, so there isn’t much the can do to adapt. It’s up to their family, friends and loved ones to learn those new skills.

King said her own experience working with those suffering dementia began with war veterans who were aged, some around 100 years of age. But after she moved to Alberta and started working, she noticed some of the residents were only in their mid-60’s, and she knew one who had Parkinson’s and mild dementia and was only 52 years of age.

“The dementia was showing up maybe two, three, four years before too,” said King. She noted that as sufferers get younger, they will live longer with dementia and friends and family need new skills to live with them for longer.

If the community doesn’t learn new skills and just lets sufferers languish, the picture is a dark one. “People living with dementia are going to become even more isolated,” said King.

“The picture is really bleak if we aren’t willing to get involved.

“We can change. We can learn to adapt and respond differently and in a better way.”

“Understanding Dementia: It Affects all of Us” will be held Thursday, May 4 from 9:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. at the First United Church located at 5115 51st Ave. in Wetaskiwin. A fee of $20 is necessary to cover costs and includes lunch and nutrition breaks.

Registration begins at 9 a.m. Registration fee must be received by First United Church before April 28 to reserve your spot. Call 780-352-2157 to pre-register.

The program is sponsored by First United Church with help from Grace Lutheran Church.

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

New intersection coming for Hwy. #2A near grain terminal

G3 Canada will begin new intersection in 2020

Franchises a great option for business-minded

BMO expert gives brief look at 2020

County of Wetaskiwin transfer donated land to Scouts Canada body

A.L. Siler originally asked county to hold land in trust in 1972

Good Neighbour award presented at Lakedell Ag Society AGM

Meryln Fontaine Memorial presented to Tammy Southern

Wetaskiwin RCMP seeking witnesses to car-jacking

Armed theft resulted in two subjects facing multiple charges

Blair says RCMP have met Wet’suwet’en conditions, so barricades should come down

The Wet’suwet’en’s hereditary chiefs oppose the Coastal GasLink project

Federal minister pledges to meet Wet’suwet’en chiefs in B.C. over natural gas pipeline

The Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs say they are visiting Mohawk territory

Pipeline dispute: Tories put no-confidence motion on House of Commons agenda

Conservatives say they have no confidence in the Trudeau government to end the rail blockades

Blockade on CN rail line in Edmonton removed, injunction granted

The blockade consisted of wooden pallets on the tracks and signs that say ‘No Consent’

Canadians aboard coronavirus-ridden cruise ship to return home tonight

Among the infected are 47 Canadians who will have to remain in Japan for treatment

Carbon risk for Alberta’s public pension manager questioned

AIMCo says nearly $115 billion invested in carbon-intensive industries is on par with other funds

Worker, shocked at future Amazon warehouse in Nisku, has died: family

Colton Quast, 25, was taken to hospital and put in a medically induced coma

Blockade supporting Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs on rail line in Edmonton

‘Cuzzins for Wet’suwet’en’ post pics of wooden crates on line, signs saying ‘No Pipelines on Stolen Land’

Higher costs should kill Trans Mountain pipeline, federal opposition says

Most recent total was $12.6 billion, much higher than a previous $7.4-billion estimate

Most Read