Man in his yard, mail carrier at work among Texas shooting rampage victims

People attend a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)People attend a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)
Travis Franklin and Holden Ewing carry American flags through the crowd gathered at the University of Texas Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, to show their support for first responders and victims injured in Saturday’s shooting. (Ben Powell/Odessa American via AP)Travis Franklin and Holden Ewing carry American flags through the crowd gathered at the University of Texas Permian Basin in Odessa, Texas, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, to show their support for first responders and victims injured in Saturday’s shooting. (Ben Powell/Odessa American via AP)
Texas Governor Greg Abbott, right, pats Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke, left, on the shoulder during a news conference about Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Texas Governor Greg Abbott, right, pats Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke, left, on the shoulder during a news conference about Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Law enforcement officials process a scene involved in Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Bullet holes are visible near the car door handle. Authorities said Sunday they still could not explain why a man with an AR-style weapon opened fire during a routine traffic stop in West Texas to begin a terrifying rampage that killed several people, injured over a dozen others and ended with officers gunning him down outside a movie theater. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Law enforcement officials process a scene involved in Saturday’s shooting, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Bullet holes are visible near the car door handle. Authorities said Sunday they still could not explain why a man with an AR-style weapon opened fire during a routine traffic stop in West Texas to begin a terrifying rampage that killed several people, injured over a dozen others and ended with officers gunning him down outside a movie theater. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke announces that he does not want to speak the name of the shooter from Saturday’s shooting during a news conference, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Instead, the department released the name of the gunman through a Facebook post. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Odessa Police Chief Michael Gerke announces that he does not want to speak the name of the shooter from Saturday’s shooting during a news conference, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Instead, the department released the name of the gunman through a Facebook post. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)
Celia Lopez and Sajeili Carrasco embrace before a vigil, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas, for victims of a shooting spree the day before. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)Celia Lopez and Sajeili Carrasco embrace before a vigil, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin, in Odessa, Texas, for victims of a shooting spree the day before. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)
Yasmin Natera and Celeste Lujan are embraced after a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin quad, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)Yasmin Natera and Celeste Lujan are embraced after a vigil for victims of a shooting spree the day before, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, at the University of Texas of the Permian Basin quad, in Odessa, Texas. (Jacy Lewis/Reporter-Telegram via AP)
Daniel Munoz reaches for his injured back during an interview, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Munoz was injured in Saturday’s shooting. The tattoo on his right hand is a biblical reference, that the wages of sin are death and God’s gift is everlasting life. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)Daniel Munoz reaches for his injured back during an interview, Sunday, Sept. 1, 2019, in Odessa, Texas. Munoz was injured in Saturday’s shooting. The tattoo on his right hand is a biblical reference, that the wages of sin are death and God’s gift is everlasting life. (AP Photo/Sue Ogrocki)

Mail carrier Mary Granados was alone in her U.S. Postal Service truck when she was shot and killed by a gunman who hijacked the white vehicle in West Texas amid his frenzy of violence.

Granados, 29, was among seven people between the ages of 15 and 57 killed Saturday. An additional 22 were injured, including a toddler.

READ MORE: At least five dead in Texas after suspect shoots at random people, police say

U.S. Postal Service officials said in a statement Sunday that they were “shocked and saddened” by the events, but were “especially grieving the loss of our postal family member.”

The shooting began with a routine traffic stop where the gunman opened fire on police, then took off in a gold car, shooting randomly for more than 10 miles (16 kilometres). At some point during the turmoil, the gunman abandoned the car and stole the postal vehicle, killing Granados. Police finally used a marked SUV to ram the mail truck outside a movie theatre in Odessa to disable the vehicle. Police then killed the gunman.

A look at some of the other victims:

Edwin Peregrino

Peregrino, 25, ran into the yard of his parents’ Odesa home to investigate after hearing gunshots, his sister, Eritizi Peregrino, told The Washington Post. The gunman drove by the home and opened fire, killing him.

“It happened at our home. You think you’re safe at your own house,” Eritizi Peregrino, 23, said in an interview. “You’re not even safe at your own house.”

Eritizi Peregrino’s husband also was shot. She said he is recovering.

Eritizi Peregrino said her brother was home for the weekend to talk about his new job and his new life in San Antonio.

“You could always count on him for anything,” she said. “He would always help my parents and his siblings. I knew I could always rely on him and call on him.”

Leila Hernandez

Leilah, 15, was with her family Saturday as her 18-year-old brother, Nathan, picked up a truck. Nathan and Leilah were shot while walking out of the dealership, her grandmother, Nora Leyva, told the Post.

“I guess he was just looking for someone to kill,” she said.

Leyva said Leilah’s mother pushed Leilah’s 9-year-old brother under a car. Nathan wrapped his arms around Leilah and was shot in the arm. Another bullet struck Leilah near her collarbone.

Leyva said as the girl died, she pleaded: “Help me, help me.”

Leilah, an Odesa High School student, celebrated her quinceañera in May.

“It was like a dream for her,” Leyva said.

Joseph Griffith

Griffith was killed while sitting at a traffic light with his wife and two children, his oldest sister, Carla Byrne, told the Post.

“This maniac pulled up next to him and shot him, took away his life, murdered my baby brother. Like nothing,” Byrne said. “We are so broken.”

Byrne said Griffith, 40, worked six days a week to support his family. He was known for his sense of humour and an uncanny ability to impersonate people.

Griffith previously worked as a math teacher. One day before his death, a former student told Griffith what an “awesome teacher he was,” his sister said.

Daniel Munoz

Munoz, 28, who was injured, recalled the harrowing details of coming into the path of the gunman, who was later killed by officers. Munoz was in his car on the way to meet a friend for a drink, when he yielded to a car coming off Interstate 20. He noticed what he feared to be a barrel of a rifle in the hands of the driver.

“This is my street instincts: When a car is approaching you and you see a gun of any type, just get down,” Munoz, who moved from San Diego about a year ago to work in oil country, told The Associated Press. “Luckily I got down. … Sure enough, I hear the shots go off. He let off at least three shots on me.”

He’s not exactly sure, but it appears one shot hit the engine, another struck the driver’s side window and a third a rear window. Some shattered glass punctured his left shoulder, causing him to bleed a lot and go to a nearby hospital. He said he’s physically OK but bewildered by the experience.

“I’m just trying to turn the corner and I got shot — I’m getting shot at?” Munoz said. “What’s the world coming to? For real?”

Anderson Davis

Seventeen-month-old Anderson had shrapnel in her right chest and injuries to her face. Texas Gov. Greg Abbott said her mother, Kelby Davis, texted: “Her mouth is pretty bad, but will heal and can be fixed. Thankfully it doesn’t seem like her jaw was hit. Just lips, teeth and tongue. … We are thanking God for healing her and appreciate continued prayers.”

A joint public statement issued by the Davis family offered thanks to emergency responders, hospital staff and “strangers who offered to help us on the street.”

Eric Finley, spokesman for UMC Health System in Lubbock, said in an email that the toddler was released from hospital Sunday.

Abbott says the girl’s mother also texted: “Toddlers are funny because they can get shot but still want to run around and play.”

Jeff Karoub, The Associated Press

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