Millet mayor resigns

Millet will go to the polls this fall to select a new leader for the community, after the town’s mayor resigned Aug. 4.

The residents of Millet will be going to the polls this fall to select a new leader for their community, after the town’s mayor resigned Aug. 4.

Rob Lorenson resigned during a council meeting last Tuesday. Assistant CAO Lisa Schoening said in an interview Aug. 5 that Lorenson, who commutes to Red Deer every day for work, resigned effective immediately with plans to move his family to Red Deer.

The town provided a statement from Lorenson on his decision. “It is with deep regret that, due to changes in our personal lives, my family has decided to relocate from Millet,” stated Lorenson.

“I will miss the people of Millet very much. I thank you for all your support over the years and wish you all the best in the future.”

Schoening said Millet council accepted the resignation with regrets; Deputy mayor Tony Wadsworth will handle the job of mayor and oversee council meetings until an election can be held.

“It was a real pleasure (working with Lorenson),” said Wadsworth by phone Aug. 5. “As a mayor he encouraged every councilor to bring their own views forward. He promoted good discussions as a council.”

Wadsworth said the resignation came as a surprise, as Lorenson had told fellow councilors he was thinking of moving, but council didn’t expect it soon.

Wadsworth said he was impressed with Lorsenson’s leadership and ability to get along with people.

Schoening also noted that a by-election will be required to fill Lorsenson’s mayor’s chair. That by-election will take place in October but no specific date has been set yet. Wadsworth added that, if a current councilor or two decides to run for mayor, they must resign first, which means Millet council could potentially lose two, or more, people. This could create quorum issues; that is, the number of councilors required to hold council meetings and conduct business.

Wadsworth said Millet council is still in a strong position. “We seem to be of a similar mindset,” he said. “Rob would be the first to say that he’s encouraged by that as well.”

 

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