File photo

Ponoka RCMP seize counterfeit bills, lay charges

Ponoka man arrested for “uttering” counterfeit currency at various stores

  • Jul. 24, 2019 2:30 p.m.

A Ponoka man has been charged with eight counts of counterfeit money.

Timothy Jay Rairdan, 40, was arrested on July 19 after being caught using a fake $100 bill at a local business.

At 7:36 p.m., a store in Ponoka contacted the RCMP to advise that a male was at the store, and had just used a counterfeit $100 bill. The RCMP arrested the male and seized the currency. He was found to be in possession of other counterfeit bills.

The RCMP allege Rairdan is responsible for four other recent, similar incidents.

On June 30, the same male is alleged to have passed a fake $50 bill at a local drug store.

On July 2, another counterfeit $50 bill was used at a different drug store.

On July 16 the same male was determined to have used two counterfeit $100 bills. The first bill was used to make a purchase, and the second bill was converted to smaller currency.

On July 18, a local bank received several counterfeit bills in deposits from various businesses, but the RCMP have not linked those bills to the male charged.

The eight counts of counterfeit money include uttering (meaning a crime where a person intends to defraud by knowingly selling, passing or publishing a forged document), using and exporting.

Rairdan has been released on a recognizance and is scheduled to appear in court on Friday, September 13, 2019 at the Provincial Court of Alberta in Ponoka.

“It’s unfortunate that so many businesses in the town fell prey to these fake bills,” said Sgt. Chris Smiley, the acting detachment commander of Ponoka RCMP.

“When in doubt, check the bill out. It pays for business owners and cashiers to know how to recognize counterfeits.”

Members of the public are reminded to check for the security features that are present in every note issued by the Bank of Canada:

· Feel the raised ink on the large number on the note.

· Look at the frosted maple leaf window to see its transparent outline.

· Feel the raised in on the words “Banque du Canada” and “Bank of Canada”.

· Look the numbers that match the note’s value and at the word “Canada” that feels slightly raised.

· Look at the metallic portrait, it matches the large portrait. Tilt to see it change colour. Flip to see it on the other side.

· Look for the maple leaves that border and cross into the large window.

If you suspect you have been offered a counterfeit note during a transaction assess the situation to ensure you are not at risk; then do the following:

· Politely refuse the note and explain that you suspect that it may be counterfeit.

· Ask for another note (and check it too).

· Advise the person to check the note with the local police.

· Inform your local police of a possible attempt to pass suspected counterfeit money

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