FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2014, file photo, Jamal Khashoggi, general manager of a new Arabic news channel, speaks during a news conference in Manama, Bahrain. Saudi Arabia is paying influential lobbyists, lawyers and public relations experts nearly $6 million a year to engage U.S. officials and promote the Middle East nation, even after several firms cut ties with the kingdom following the disappearance of journalist Khashoggi. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali, File)

FILE - In this Dec. 15, 2014, file photo, Jamal Khashoggi, general manager of a new Arabic news channel, speaks during a news conference in Manama, Bahrain. Saudi Arabia is paying influential lobbyists, lawyers and public relations experts nearly $6 million a year to engage U.S. officials and promote the Middle East nation, even after several firms cut ties with the kingdom following the disappearance of journalist Khashoggi. (AP Photo/Hasan Jamali, File)

Q&A: One year on, Khashoggi’s fiancee still seeking answers

Jamal Khashoggi’s body was never found after he was killed inside Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul

Nearly a year ago, a team of 15 Saudi government agents was sent to Istanbul, where it killed Saudi columnist and critic Jamal Khashoggi inside the kingdom’s consulate. Khashoggi’s body was never found.

The Oct. 2 killing and attempts to cover it up drew international condemnation, and the reputation of Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman has never fully recovered. Saudi Arabia insists the powerful heir had no involvement in an operation that included agents who reported directly to him.

Saudi Arabia’s trial of some of those agents has been held in secret. As of yet, no one has been convicted.

Khashoggi had entered the consulate to collect a document that would let him wed his Turkish fiancee, Hatice Cengiz, who was waiting for him outside. He never returned.

On Thursday, The Associated Press talked with Cengiz on the sidelines of the U.N. General Assembly. Below are excerpts of the interview. Cengiz spoke through a Turkish translator, and the interview has been edited for length and clarity.

Nearly one year later, your fiance’s body has not been found and no one has been convicted. What are your thoughts today?

My purpose is to concentrate on what else could be done to enable justice for Jamal. And that’s why I keep attending various events to make Jamal’s voice heard. And, of course, nothing will bring Jamal back. For this reason, my aim is to also give a voice to thousands of prisoners in Saudi Arabia.

Do you believe the crown prince ordered this or was directly involved? If so, do you think the world has held him accountable?

When we look at the actions of Saudi Arabia and the debates taking place at the U.N. Human Rights Council, and the independent report that was issued by the independent rapporteur of the United Nations, it shows us that this murder was not limited to the perpetrators. It was committed on a diplomatic compound, and these individuals made use of diplomatic opportunities in order to go to Turkey to commit this crime.

What do you want the crown prince to say that he hasn’t already said?

What I’m expecting the crown prince to tell me is: Why was Jamal killed? Where is his body? What was the motive for this murder? What we witnessed was a horrible murder, actually. So I don’t want him to depict everything like a homicide case on a TV series. I’m curious about the answer to these questions.

Can you discuss how the killing has been politicized by saudi arabia and turkey?

Turkey did its best to make use of diplomatic channels. And I honestly believe that Turkey did not politicize Jamal’s case. Turkey did its best to respect diplomatic rules and to conduct the investigation according to international standards, vis-a-vis international organizations. And as you do know, Jamal’s murder took place in a diplomatic compound and Turkey had to respect this international convention on diplomatic compounds.

As for Saudi Arabia, you mentioned Turkey’s involvement or support of Muslim groups and the Muslim Brotherhood being used as a pretext by Saudi Arabia. I believe that such a stance is an understandable reaction on the Saudi side because a team coming from Saudi Arabia committed murder in Turkey. So, of course, for psychological reasons, without that they will try to put the blame on Turkey or they will try to abuse, you know, Turkey in this larger picture. So it’s quite understandable.

Anything else you’d like to say?

After a year, I can say that the entire world is mobilized for Jamal. During the last month, I gave more than 30 interviews and wrote many columns for international media. During the coming year, what I want to see is concrete reaction. Rather than discussing these questions and answers, I’d like to see and discuss the concrete actions to be taken by international stakeholders.

Aya Batrawy And Robert Bumsted, The Associated Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

File photo
Gov’t of Alberta identifies estimated 300 new COVID-19 cases Sunday

Online COVID-19 dashboard unavailable as upgrades being completed

COVID
Red Deer down to 313 active cases of COVID-19

Alberta reports an additional 411 COVID-19 cases

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Alex Panetta
Economists “cautiously hopeful” for economic recovery in Alberta

Charles St. Arnaud says Alberta’s recovery will rebound along with roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccine

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw acknowledged that Friday would be one year since the first case of COVID-19 was identified in the province. (photography by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Three more Red Deer COVID-19 deaths, 331 active cases in Alberta

Red Deer is down to 362 active cases of the virus

Elvira D’Angelo, 92, waits to receive her COVID-19 vaccination shot at a clinic in Montreal, Sunday, March 7, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
‘It’s been a good week’: Tam hopeful on vaccines as pandemic anniversary nears

Tam says the addition of two new vaccines will help Canadians get immunized faster

Kiara Robillard is seen in an undated handout photo. When the pandemic began, Robillard had to rush back home to Alberta from California, where she had been living for five years, after she was struck by a truck that broke her spine in two places. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Kiara Robillard, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
‘It kind of clicks:’ Text4Hope program helps with depression, anxiety during pandemic

Participants receive one text message every morning for three months

(The Canadian Press)
‘Worse than Sept. 11, SARS and financial crisis combined’: Tourism industry in crisis

Travel services saw the biggest drop in active businesses with 31 per cent fewer firms operating

Hockey hall-of-fame legend Wayne Gretzky, right, watches the casket of his father, Walter Gretzky, as it is carried from the church during a funeral service in Brantford, Ont., Saturday, March 6, 2021. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky remembered as a man with a ‘heart of gold’ at funeral

The famous hockey father died Thursday at age 82 after battling Parkinson’s disease

Supporters rally outside court as Pastor James Coates of GraceLife Church is in court to appeal bail conditions, after he was arrested for holding day services in violation of COVID-19 rules, in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday March 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
‘Law remains valid:’ Pastor accused of violating health orders to remain in jail

The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is representing the pastor

A decommissioned pumpjack is shown at a well head on an oil and gas installation near Cremona, Alta., Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016. The Alberta Energy Regulator says it is suspending all of the licences held by an oil and gas producer with more than 2,200 wells and 2,100 pipelines after it failed to bring its operations into compliance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta Energy Regulator suspends licences of oil and gas producer that owes $67M

The company is being asked to comply with past orders to clean up historic spills and contamination

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference in Ottawa Friday, March 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Trudeau holds firm on premiers’ health-care funding demands, COVID-19 aid comes first

Premiers argue that the current amount doesn’t keep pace with yearly cost increases of about five per cent

Seniors in the 65-unit Piper Creek Lodge are among those waiting for COVID-19 vaccinations. (File photo by Advocate staff)
Central Alberta senior lodges anxiously waiting for COVID-19 vaccinations

“Should be at the front of the line, not the back of the line”

Most Read