Special guest to city rocked a Wetaskiwin stage Aug. 31

From ferries to festivals, Jeremy Dallas known for entertaining audiences

The City and the County of Wetaskiwin had an exceptionally busy August as far as entertainment goes.

It was difficult to decide amongst the music events, museum native art show, conservation awareness walks, tractor pulls or parades and bbq’s. Despite the often confusing and annoying weather, our city and county showed its pride for all things fun and food.

One music event was a very special guest to our city and he rocked the stage at Slicks on Saturday night. From ferries to festivals, Jeremy Dallas is known for entertaining audiences wherever they may be. Born and raised in Prince Edward Island, Jeremy has found a home in the Alberta prairies while never forgetting his coastal roots.

With a sound that cannot fit in one box, Jeremy seamlessly blends the energy of pop music with classic country influence to create a sound all of his own. Never one to conform, Jeremy’s fusion of genres is what makes him such an exciting up-and-comer in the Canadian country music industry. More likely to be compared to Dustin Lynch than Luke Bryan, Jeremy’s focus has never been on what has already been done, but rather what comes next.

A proud member of the Alberta country music community, Jeremy has already received a nomination for the Association of Country Music in Alberta “Male Artist of the Year” award, as well as the “Fan’s Choice” award. His debut single, Under the Radar, was on the Top 10 DMDS chart for Canadian radio stations for ten consecutive days after its release and was picked up by both traditional radio and

satellite radio stations across the country. His next single, Mess Me Up, was released June 2018.

Having performed over 300 shows to date, Jeremy Lamont has a well-tuned, high energy show that never fails to impress. He has already shared the stage with many of the acts he looks up to, including Brett Kissel, Washboard Union, George Canyon, Dan and Shay, Lonestar, Sammy Kershaw and Aaron Goodvin. With a dedication to his craft and a true passion for performing, Jeremy has no plans to slow down and will continue playing stages across the country.

Keep an eye out for this talent as he has good connections in and around Wetaskiwin and looks forward to coming back to entertain us again.

Submitted by Susan C. Kokas

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