Wetaskiwin voters overwhelmingly elected Mike Lake

UPDATEDConservative Mike Lake wins Edmonton-Wetaskiwin

Canada is now under Liberal rule with newly decided Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the helm.

UPDATED Canada is now under Liberal rule with newly decided Prime Minister Justin Trudeau at the helm. However, the Edmonton-Wetaskiwin electoral district remains under Conservative care with Mike Lake.

Lake earned 65.7 per cent with 44,941 votes.

“It’s a different world for us,” said Lake Wednesday. Having never been the Opposition before he says it is something he will have to become accustomed to.

Lake says his next step as MP is to continue to meet with constituents across the district, “To listen to to what people have to say whether they voted for me or not.”

“When I get to Ottawa I’ll continue to fight for our constituents,” he added.

Lake feels the election showed many of the voters in the district wish for a fiscally responsible government but there is not only one view present. “Any group of 120,00 has a range of views.”

As the elected representative, Lake says it is his responsibility to understand the consensus. “Here the consensus overwhelmingly was a stable approach to economic views.”

“It’s an absolute honour to be able to serve,” he added.

Libertarian candidate Brayden Whitlock is also pleased with the district outcome of the election.“IthinkMike’sgoingtodoaverygoodjobkeepingaresponsiblevoice.”

“It’s good to have somebody fiscally responsible,” he added.

On the outcome of the district in the election Whitlock says people need a fiscally responsible government, leaving them with two choices. One simply had name recognition and resources while the other did not.

Over the next couple of months Whitlock feels people of the district will continue to be fiscally responsible while across the county people will come to realize spending money that is not available is not a good idea.

Whitlock earned 0.8 per cent with 515 votes.

Liberal candidate Jacqueline Biollo is “thrilled” with the results of the election, nationally. “Canada has an opportunity for real change.”

“Locally I think we all recognize Alberta is a tough place,” she added.

With many taking a Conservative stance Biollo says there is caution when it comes to forward thinking.

When it comes to her own campaign Biollo says she was hoping for a better result but understands each individual voter needed to articulate what they feel their needs are across the diverse rural and urban district.

Biollo earned 21.4 per cent with 14,660 votes.

Green Party’s Joy-Ann Hut feel the outcome of the election in the riding was no surprise. “It went well, it’s somewhat predictable.”

She says people continue to remain loyal to the parties they have believed in for years.

Hut has no predictions for what the change in government will bring to the county, province and district. I’m waiting to see just like everybody else.”

Hut earned 2.3 per cent with 1,595 votes.

Fritz Bitz, NDP candidate, found the results of the local election and her party’s numbers surprising. When she last looked at the situation she felt there was very little in the way of Liberal support. “I thought it was a race between Mike Lake and myself.”

Bitz says over the next four years there is a lot of work to be done in the area to build the district and party membership base.

I feel it was so much ABC (Anything But Conservative) among the undecided. I feel the polls had a huge impact on it,” said Bitz, referring to the election results.

Bitz expects the Liberal Party to spend the next few months getting settled into its role as a majority government. “It takes a couple of months to get their feet on the ground. I would expect however they take a good long look at their election promises.”

“For me, as an Aboriginal woman, I hope Trudeau stands up to his promises to Aboriginal people,” she added.

Bitz earned 9.7 per cent with 6,646 votes.

In the Edmonton-Wetaskiwin district 68,357 of 98,502 registered electors, 69.4 per cent, does not include electors who registered on election day voted at 264 polls.

 

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