Donald Trump isn’t in charge in Canada

As a Canadian, I’ve always been interested in the laws and rules that govern our country – and the opportunities grassroots...

Dear editor,

As a Canadian, I’ve always been interested in the laws and rules that govern our country and the opportunities grassroots politics present for individuals, families, entrepreneurs, public and private corporations, and international relations. Canada is a democratic society, with a vision and an agenda that is positive, ambitious, and hopeful.

Recent electoral decisions, including those in the United States, might leave some with the alarming impression that Canadian values have somehow been compromised. Regardless of what the relationship with president-elect Donald Trump will be, Canadians should focus on cornerstone principles that affect us first and foremost.

Not-withstanding strengthening international relations, championing climate control, or national defense campaigns but education, awareness, acceptance and leadership regarding diversity and inclusion, respect for anyone of any gender, race, age, sexual orientation, religion, profession, education, or socioeconomic background.

Varied approaches to political posturing, in particular, need not (and should not) focus solely on the negative, the need for power and control, or the perceived backroom culture. Rather, as we watch (and participate) in the vital role our country will play in democratic engagement let’s work together to ensure it is always conducted with the utmost integrity.

The next four years as Canada responds and reacts to our relationship with the United States, (and not to mention the next municipal, provincial and federal electoral cycle) will present opportunities for individuals like you and me to get involved, keep the government accountable, and be leaders in our own communities.

Whether your focus is on local infrastructure, jobs and the economy, education, health care, immigration, or solely based on the values of honesty and respect I’m confident Canada will remain a leader on the world stage and that we have the potential to always be ‘great’.

Jacqueline Biollo, Leduc

 

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