Liberal leader Justin Trudeau sets new standard for hypocrisy

Deeply hypocritical ‘brownface’ episodes should seal Trudeau’s fate

Sitting around this weekend, I spent a bit of time pondering who to vote for in the upcoming federal election. In our Canadian system, we vote for local MP candidates, and the party that wins a majority of seats in the House of Commons names a prime minister.

The current prime minister, unless he’s made out of Teflon, should see his political career end during this election. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau saw, this past week, three distasteful episodes from his past come back to haunt him.

The instances of “brownface” or “blackface”, according to Canadian Press, included “one from his teens, one from his time as a whitewater rafting guide in his 20s, and one when he was a teacher at a Vancouver private school.” This from a SJW giving the impression of an anti-racism crusader. A few days ago members of his party pointed out all sorts of support Trudeau’s given minorities in Canada, including putting a black woman on the $10 bill and the fact that Trudeau’s Liberal government decided to closely examine the way federal policies affect minorities and women.

It would seem the prime minister was able to pull the wool over the eyes of many people, covering up his bizarre predilection with mocking dark-skinned minorities through Halloween costumes.

Former Ontario NDP premier Kathleen Wynn last week referred to Trudeau in his pre-blackface days as “perfect.” Perhaps he was perfect in the brain of some Liberal sycophant living on another planet, but he is, and always has been, far from it.

His trip to India two years was an international joke, ranging from he and his family’s decision to “go local” with traditional Indian garb and praying hands that, in the light of brownface now seems almost insulting, to the fact that Trudeau allowed into his entourage a known terrorist.

The ongoing SNC-Lavalin controversy was, in my opinion, not taken seriously enough in the federal government. According to online encyclopedia Wikipedia, “After a six-month-long investigation, Ethics Commissioner Dion issued a report that concluded that Trudeau had contravened Section 9 of the federal Conflict of Interest Act by improperly pressuring Wilson-Raybould. Dion wrote that while Wilson-Raybould was never officially directed to interfere, this influence was ‘tantamount to political direction’. Dion did not find that any actual political interference in the prosecution occurred; however, he reported he did not have access to all of the evidence. Under the Act, there are no sanctions specified for the violation.”

What do you think would happen to an everyday Canadian like me if I was found to have been interfering in a criminal case against a corporate entity?

I’m not even going to get into his moronic carbon tax philosophy, which will have no effect on international climate change and will interfere with Canadian companies and their ability to compete internationally, not to mention waste tax money from people like me, who cannot afford to have money wasted.

This week, Trudeau’s main message was “please judge me for recent actions, not past actions.” The same week his campaign was attacking Conservative leader Andrew Scheer for not supporting gay marriage in 2005.

You would hope Canadians will send a message to hypocrites like Trudeau by ending his political career permanently on election day. I guess we’ll see if that happens.

Stu Salkeld is editor of The Wetaskiwin Pipestone Flyer and writes a regular column for the paper.

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