Ben Turner – Liberal Hopeful

Pipestone Flyer

A local man wants to change the face of Parliament. Twenty-two-year-old Ben Turner is vying for a Liberal nomination to run in the newly created Edmonton-Wetaskiwin riding in the next federal election. “I’m not too pleased with the current government. I gave them my vote and I feel like they turned around and betrayed it,” he said.

Currently, said Turner, the House of Commons is made up mostly of lawyers and business people and he doesn’t believe it accurately represents the true face of Canada. Turner works as a labourer but also calls himself an artist and a millennial and believes more people are like him than the current elected representatives.

“This is a group that is just not represented in any party. I’d like to change the discourse a bit.”

It’s been 20 years since a Liberal from this area was elected to the House of Commons, he said. He wants to see that change and believes he can be a voice for Edmonton-Wetaskiwin with the focus being on coming up with solutions rather than partisan politics. For example, when it comes to the oil and gas industry there has always been two sides to the argument…either say yes to a pipeline or no.

“We need to change the way we talk,” he said. Instead of choosing black and white solutions, Turner said why not build a pipeline and use money generated from that line into renewable, alternative sources of energy. “We’ll always need oil, but there are alternatives for fuelling our cars. We can do both,” he said.

Originally from Calmar, Turner currently lives in Leduc. While he hasn’t held office before, Turner said he’s been active in Rotary International and helped start the high school-based program Interact (a youth division of Rotary) when he was in high school in Calmar. He has also been active in the Thorsby Army Cadet program. He has traveled all over the world and wants to use what he learned to change how decisions that affect Canadians are made.

“In the current political climate, I’ve watched lots of cuts to education. Tuition fees are going up and government funding is going down. I went to school but had to quit because I couldn’t afford it. I had to make the decision to stay in school and pay back thousands of dollars or get a job and make a living.”

Knowing that’s a choice for many young people, Turner wants to change that. He also wants to see more money in the hands of Canadian families but the current Conservative government income-splitting proposal is not feasible.

“Income splitting only applies to about 15 per cent but it costs $2 billion. At a time when we’re cutting education and health services I’d like to see this county reinvest in education. We can’t afford to fall behind (other countries). We need to see more money, not less.”

Turner also wants to put an end to the omnibus bills and make Parliament more transparent.

“It you’re trying to push something through, it’s easy to hide it in there,” he said. “We need more accountability and a government looking after the middle class more than the upper class.”

While there are some who would question his youth, Turner said we have a “very young population” in the area, which would make him representative of their ideas.

“My age doesn’t nullify my ideas. I am inspired by the people who live and work here.”

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Second annual Sledz and Treadz Poker Rally at Pigeon Lake Feb. 29

Vehicle and poker event will benefit Lakedell School

Summer villages would like to fix Range Road #11

County of Wetaskiwin hears about problems with Pigeon Lake route

Farmers, please check your canola bins

Spoiling occurs, and producers don’t want to suffer for it

AHS review is a key commitment to Albertans

Internal savings will allow more money to be directed to patients and front-line care

Lengthy vehicle chase includes attempt to ram police vehicle says RCMP

Wetaskiwin RCMP charge three after police vehicle rammed

VIDEO: Minister reports ‘modest progress’ after blockade talks with First Nation

Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs say Coastal GasLink does not have authority to go through their lands

Canadian nurses’ unions warn national standards for coronavirus protection too low

President says safety protocols nationwide are inadequate compared to those in Ontario and other countries

Murder of sex worker exposes Canada’s hypocrisy on prostitution: advocate

A 2014 law made purchasing sex or benefiting from the selling of sex illegal

Canada’s flag was flown for first time 55 years ago today

The flag is used to celebrate wins in sports, honour Canada Day, and flown at half-mast after tragedy

No shirts, no city services: Firefighter calendar too steamy for Ontario officials

The city has never funded the calendars, but has OK’d photoshoots at city-owned properties

CFL teams under the microscope after free agency begins

While some big names remain, here’s what lies ahead leading up to next month’s CFL combine in Toronto

Kenney says ongoing rail blockade risks becoming an economic crisis

‘I think Canadians are losing patience with this. I know Indigenous people are’

CFL’s Edmonton Eskimos keep team name following consultations

Talks stem from 2015 concerns about Inuit people being used as mascots in sports

Most Read