New Owner for Cooking Lake Airport

Pipestone Flyer

 

A plane of a long-ago era, that used to fly into Cooking Lake Airport. This is the same type of aircraft that was flown by Canadian Ace Billy Bishop.

 

Cooking Lake, AB – On November 26, the Edmonton Regional Airports Authority (Edmonton Airports) announced that the ownership and operation of the Cooking Lake Airport was transferred to the Cooking Lake Airport Condominium Association, which represents the owners of more than 130 aircraft and 70 hangars based at the airport. 

While the Edmonton International Airport is designed primarily for scheduled passenger service, three small airports in the region provide service for air charter, flight training and recreational aircraft: Cooking Lake (20 minutes from Leduc via the Henday or Highways 21 and 14), Wetaskiwin and Camrose. 

While the official transfer of the airport occurred during an AGM on October 1st, Edmonton Airports will continue to remain actively involved in supporting the airport over the coming months as the Association gains operational proficiency and begins moving forward with its expansion plans including the development of new hangar lots.

“The planning for the ownership transition began several years ago. As one of the busiest small airports in Canada, it is critical to do this right to ensure safety and not impede air traffic while also setting the airport up to be self-sustaining over the long term,” said Jim Johannsson, president of the Cooking Lake Airport Condominium Association. “It has been a complex undertaking and we are deeply grateful to Edmonton Airports for their expert guidance and support in making the transition.” 

A noteworthy fact is that this is the first Condominium Association in Canada to own a small airport. Owners of private planes calling Cooking Lake Airport ‘home’ can now proudly state that they in fact, are airport owners.  Currently the home to two flight schools, Cooking Lake Airport is an “uncontrolled” airport like most of the 500+ small airports in Canada: this means that without a tower and air traffic controllers, and with only a single runway, pilots have to abide by standard traffic patterns and arrival and departure procedures that ensure the total safety of flight traffic at Cooking Lake Airport.

Diane Trenn, vice-president of Operations for Edmonton Airports, highlighted the rich history of the airport and the vital role it plays in the Edmonton region. “For the past 86 years, the Cooking Lake Airport has been the starting point of some of the greatest adventures in Canadian aviation history. Today, the airport is primarily a home base for recreational aircraft and small commercial operators,” said Trenn. “The time is now right for those aircraft and hangar owners to take over the stewardship of this historic airport and chart its course for future generations of pilots.”

Built in 1926, Cooking Lake Airport has been a popular destination for Edmonton area aviation enthusiasts for more than 80 years. Some come to watch the airplanes and some come to fulfill their dreams of learning to fly, while others use their aircraft to better manage their business interests across Western Canada. “While they are no longer making aviation history, many of the pilots based at Cooking Lake are using the airport as a starting point for their own great lifetime adventures. Flying an airplane should be on everyone’s bucket list and Cooking Lake Airport is one of the best places in Canada to do it,” added Johannsson. 

Local pilots and plane owners looking into new storing facilities can contact Jim Johannsson directly at 780-920-9519 or by email at jim.johannsson@telus.com. Future developments at the Cooking Lake Airport will be under watch and reported in this weekly publication. 

 

Just Posted

County council moves ahead on ‘speed curves’

Safety concerns, build standards basis for removing certain curves in county

President Trump appears to be in a lot of trouble

Investigators appear to use mafia-breaking techniques

Rimbey RCMP on scene of serious collision

A portion of Highway 53 west of Rimbey is down to one lane while crews investigate

City hops on the plastic bag banning wagon

City of Wetaskiwin hopes new single-use plastic bag bylaw will extend life of landfill

New Wetaskiwin family learning programs fill in the gaps

Rainbows and Roots of Empathy support programs come to Wetaskiwin

U.S. congressman issues dire warning to Canada’s NAFTA team: time is running out

Canadian Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is expected to resume talks with the U.S.

Kim agrees to dismantle main nuke site if US takes steps too

Kim promised to accept international inspectors to monitor the closing of a key missile test site and launch pad and to visit Seoul soon.

Wetaskiwin RCMP looking for missing youth

Police say 12-year-old Treston Minde left his residence on his bike Sept. 17 and hasn’t returned home

North Carolina gov pleads with storm evacuees to be patient

The death toll rose to at least 37 in three states Tuesday, with 27 fatalities in North Carolina.

North and South Korea say they plan to bid for 2032 Olympics

Moon and Kim announced a sweeping set of agreements including a vow to work together to host the Summer Olympics in 2032.

Russia’s reinstatement after doping scandal goes to a vote

The World Anti-Doping Agency is due to vote Thursday Sept. 20, 2018, on possible reinstatement of Russia.

Ontario wins stay on ruling that struck down council-cutting plan

The province had argued the stay was necessary to eliminate uncertainty surrounding the Oct. 22 vote, and the Court of Appeal agreed.

B.C. cannabis producer Tilray hits at $20-billion high as stock price explodes

This is the first export of a cannabis product from a Canadian company to the U.S.

‘Sesame Street’ wants to clarify: Bert and Ernie aren’t gay

The characters are best friends and have many human traits but “remain puppets, and do not have a sexual orientation”

Most Read