The Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods (SCAN) unit makes communities safer by using civil legislation to target residential and commercial problem properties in rural and urban Alberta.

SCAN Program Targets Problem Properties

Are you concerned that a property in your community might be being used for drug trafficking, prostitution or gang-related crimes?

The Safer Communities and Neighbourhoods (SCAN) unit makes communities safer by using civil legislation to target residential and commercial problem properties in rural and urban Alberta.

Not only does SCAN work to improve community safety, it empowers citizens through a complaint-driven process. It targets property, not individuals, holding property owners accountable for activities on their properties.

Here’s how SCAN works:

SCAN uses civil legislation to target properties, not people, holding owners accountable for regularly occurring activity such as drug trafficking, prostitution and gang-related crimes on their property.

The initiative also supports landlords by helping them remove problem tenants who disrupt neighbourhoods and destroy property.

A resource for communities across Alberta, the unit initiates investigations based on citizen tips and works in partnership with residents to increase safety.

When a community member reports a problem property to SCAN, the unit begin an investigation. If the activity is confirmed, investigators will contact the property owner to try to solve the problem informally.

If needed, SCAN can also apply to the courts for a Community Safety Order that calls for owners to meet a number of conditions, or for the property to be closed for up to 90 days.

Any criminal activity uncovered when dealing with these properties is turned over to the police to investigate.

At the same time, your information is confidential and safe – no one, without your written consent will disclose your identity to another person, court, body or law enforcement agency.

What are signs I can look for in my neighbourhood?

The following are common signs of suspicious or illegal activity. Observing one of the following doesn’t always signal illegal activity, but if they occur frequently or together, a problem may exist.

If you’re suspicious of a property, DO NOT investigate it yourself or approach the occupants. Contact local police or SCAN.

  • Residents who are rarely seen, distant or secretive
  • Frequent visitors and unusual traffic at odd times of the day or night
  • People repeatedly visiting the property who only go to the door for short durations
  • Increased vehicle or foot traffic
  • Frequent late-night activity
  • Windows blackened or curtains always drawn
  • Extensive investment in home security
  • Neglected property and yard
  • Presence of drug paraphernalia or strange odours coming from the property
  • Residents who regularly meet vehicles near the property for short periods of time

How do I file a complaint?

To report a problem property and play a role in keeping your community safe, contact SCAN toll-free at 1-866-960-SCAN (7226) or file a complaint online at scan.alberta.ca

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