May the forage be with you and your herd

On land not so far away, farmers across the Canadian prairies will see their herds going to the green side

  • Feb. 3, 2017 6:00 a.m.

On land not so far away

Submitted by Ducks Unlimited Canada

 

On land not so far away, farmers across the Canadian prairies will see their herds going to the green side thanks to a forage program available now from Ducks Unlimited Canada (DUC) and Crop Production Services (CPS).

Available to agricultural producers in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba, the DUC/CPS forage program provides cash-back incentives on all Proven® Seed forage seed purchases paid at full-retail price when producers convert cultivated land to hay or pastureland. In Alberta and Saskatchewan, producers receive a rebate of $100 per 50 lb. bag of forage seed; in Manitoba, producers receive a rebate of up to $125 for every new forage acre seeded as part of the program.

With the growing need for high quality pastureland, it’s expected that this year’s program will be an attractive option for producers, says Craig Bishop, DUC’s regional forage lead, especially in light of economic and climatic conditions.

“Declining prices for wheat and other cereal crops, as well as a simultaneous increase in beef prices, are leading many landowners to increase the size of their cattle herd,” explains Bishop. “This spurs a demand for more forage. Last year’s weather conditions also resulted in poor hay crops and further motivated producers to convert more land to forage. In 2016 across the Prairies, 30,000 acres of cultivated fields were seeded to grass under this program with CPS.”

Bishop adds that reducing input costs, especially at a time when expenses are rising more quickly than revenues, makes a real difference to a farmer’s or rancher’s bottom line. “Offering incentives to producers to convert cultivated acres to forage is an extremely cost-effective means for increasing grassland and it makes good agronomic sense. Essentially, the program covers approximately 40–50 per cent of the producer’s seed investment.”

In addition to helping cattle producers, more forage acres also benefits waterfowl. Bishop explains that research shows that the level of waterfowl nesting is significantly higher in areas of perennial cover than in cultivated fields. It also helps with other conservation measures such as wetland restoration.

“The link between wetlands, associated grasslands and waterfowl productivity is well understood,” says Bishop, “and initiatives like the DUC/CPS forage program ensures that farmers in Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba also receive benefits from increasing their forage base.”

The DUC/CPS forage program is best suited for producers in the parkland and prairie regions. Anyone interested in the program or who wants more information should contact their local CPS retailer or DUC conservation program specialist.

 

Just Posted

Cow feeding economics for the 2019-20 winter season

Keep in mind prrice and availability of feed

Boat and trailer purchase necessary, hears county council

Several departments needed a better boat says CAO

Hot Habanero jelly good for a get-together

Homemade applesauce recipe in this week’s kitchen

First Nations given max compensation for Ottawa’s child-welfare discrimination

2016 ruling said feds didn’t give same funding for on-reserve kids as was given to off-reserve kids

Branco, Blatz-Morgan win City of Wetaskiwin by-election race Sept. 11

Branco records 761 votes, Blatz-Morgan 688: unofficial results

Fashion Fridays: 10 effortlessly stylish items for fall

Kim XO, helps to keep you looking good on Fashion Fridays on the Black Press Media Network

Red Deer Rebels drop preseason tilt to Tigers 5-3

Rebels fail to score after three first period goals

Canada Post has unfair advantage in distributing flyers: news group

Crown corporation argues newspapers, private operators deliver majority of flyers in Canada

Western Canadian Baseball team, stadium coming to Sylvan Lake

The Town announced they are finalizing an agreement to have a WCBL team in the future sports park

Sylvan Lake’s rainbow crosswalk defaced with homophobic message

The crosswalk was repainted Thursday morning to remove traces of the spray-painted words

Mounties lay secrets-law charges against one of their own

Cameron Ortis has been charged under the Security of Information Act

Canadian bobsledder Kaillie Humphries files lawsuit in bid to race for U.S.

Two-time world champion wants to expedite release from national team after filing harassment claims

Absent Trudeau is main target in leaders’ first election debate

Vying for third place, both NDP and Green leaders paint Liberals and Tories as establishment parties

Moose breaks into Fort St. John school district office

Conservation officers found the animal and determined it was fine, ‘all things considered’

Most Read