Actor William Shatner smiles while taking questions from reporters, Sunday, May 6, 2018, after delivering the commencement address at New England Institute of Technology graduation ceremonies, in Providence, R.I. Gov. Gen. Julie Payette is honouring 39 people with the Order of Canada this morning, including actor William Shatner, writer Ann-Marie MacDonald and lawyer James Lockyer. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP, Steven Senne

Shatner, Obomsawin among 39 inductees to Order of Canada today

Shatner is being given one of Canada’s highest civilian honours for his 60-year career

Gov. Gen. Julie Payette is honouring 39 people with the Order of Canada this morning, including actor William Shatner, writer Ann-Marie MacDonald and lawyer James Lockyer.

Shatner is being given one of Canada’s highest civilian honours for his 60-year career in theatre, television and film; MacDonald for her art and advocacy for women and on LGBTQ issues; and Lockyer for his work championing people wrongly convicted of crimes.

Mathematician Robert Langlands, filmmaker Alanis Obomsawin and actor Donald Sutherland are also being made companions of the order, the most prestigious of its three levels.

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Payette will preside over the ceremony at Rideau Hall in Ottawa.

The order was established in 1967, Canada’s centennial year.

Close to 7,500 people have been invested in the order since then.

The list of today’s inductees:

Companions

Robert Phelan Langlands, of Montreal and Princeton, N.J., for contributions to mathematics

Alanis Obomsawin, of Montreal, for documentary filmmaking and promoting Indigenous issues

Donald McNichol Sutherland, of Saint John, N.B., for acting and international promotion of Canada

Officers

Francois Crepeau, of Montreal, for contributions to international law and human rights

Ann-Marie MacDonald, of Toronto, for writing and promoting LGBTQ+ and women’s rights

William Shatner, of Montreal and Los Angeles, for acting and charitable work

Peter Suedfeld, of Vancouver, for research in psychological responses to harsh environments

Ian E. Wilson, of Ottawa, for service to Library and Archives Canada and the preservation of history

Members

Shelley Ann Marie Brown, of Saskatoon, for trailblazing for women in accounting

Raymond J. Cole, of Vancouver, for research and education in environmentally responsible architecture

Patrick Ralph Crawford, of Winnipeg, for improving the practice and promoting the history of dentistry

Joanne Cuthbertson and Charles Fischer, of Calgary, for philanthropy and promoting education, children’s health, the arts and responsible business

Thomas Ralston Denton, of Winnipeg, for championing refugees and immigrants

Claire Deschenes, of Quebec City, for trailblazing for women in engineering

Lyse Doucet, of Bathurst, N.B. and London, U.K., for international journalism

Edna Agnes Ekhivalak Elias, of Qurluqtuq, Nunavut, for preserving Inuit language and culture as commissioner of Nunavut

Jean Andre Elie, of Montreal, for supporting the arts

Ann McCain Evans, of Florenceville-Bristol, N.B., for philanthropy and volunteerism

David Glenn Fountain, of Halifax, for philanthropy and fundraising, especially for education and health care

John Ferguson Godfrey, of Toronto, for public service as a politician, educator and environmentalist

Serge Gouin, of Outremont, Que., for advancing the communications industry in Quebec

Barbara Jackman, of Toronto, for championing refugees and immigrants

Christina Jennings, of Toronto, for work in film and television (and creating “Murdoch Mysteries”)

Andy Jones, of St. John’s, N.L., for acting and authorship of children’s books

Bengt Jorgen, of Toronto, for promoting and teaching ballet

Robert Korneluk, of Ottawa, for research in molecular genetics and immunotherapy

Gilbert Laporte, of Montreal, for research in decision sciences

Walter J. Learning, of Fredericton, for service to theatre as an actor, director and writer

James Lockyer, of Toronto, for championing the wrongly convicted

Joseph Robert Nuss, of Montreal, for service to human rights as a judge and lawyer

Hanna Maria Pappius, of Montreal, for research in neurochemistry, promoting animal rights, and service to the Polish-Canadian community

Kathleen Reichs, of Montreal and Charlotte, N.C., an honorary appointment for work in forensic anthropology and as a crime novelist

Henri-Paul Rousseau, of Montreal, for work as an administrator and economic adviser

Brenda Harris Singer, of Toronto, for promoting community-based mental-health services

Arthur Slutsky, of Toronto, for medical research and as a hospital administrator

Dorothy E. Smith, of Vancouver and Toronto, for advancing feminism in the study of sociology

Allan H. Wachowich, of Edmonton, for service as a lawyer, judge and community volunteer

John Wade, of Winnipeg, for contributions to medical education and practice

The Canadian Press

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