Town of Millet seeks land use bylaw public input through open house

Town will not allow residents to sit on advisory committee

Just an open house is not what one Town of Millet resident was hoping to see in terms of how public input would be collected for the updated Millet land use bylaw.

Dave Horner presented to council, as a delegation on the agenda, during its Feb. 14 meeting, his wish for the town to allow residents or members at large to be a part of the land use bylaw advisory committee.

The committee consists of three council members and town staff.

Horner had previously made council and the town aware of his idea in an email prior to the meeting and said he was at the meeting to advocate on behalf of a group of residents, including himself and his wife. “Citizens from this community have a right to provide input.”

Millet is hosting its land use bylaw open house on Feb. 21 from 3 to 7 p.m. in council chambers.

Mayor Tony Wadsworth says council is wholly in favour of residents having opportunities to provide input on the land use bylaw, but that having residents sit on the advisory is not the best way to meet the needs of everyone involved.

Coun. Carol Sadoroszney says allowing residents to sit on the advisory committee would be premature in the process of updating the bylaw.

Wadsworth informed Horner the town’s land use bylaw is an arduous document collaboratively constructed by town administrative staff, council, and the Municipal Planning Commission — which includes members at large.

In the past it was the norm in municipal processes for one public hearing to be regarded as “enough” public input. “But that’s changing. That’s (open house) the first stage,” said Wadsworth.

He added holding the open house will give residents the chance to provide their thoughts and feelings and vision of Millet to council.

With all the different players involved, Horner questioned how long until the amended bylaw can be implemented.

“I would anticipate council would pass third reading on this bylaw September-ish,” said CAO Teri Pelletier.

Pelletier explained the Town of Millet does not want to drag out the process longer than necessary and impact future development and opportunities that need the bylaw in place. “We’re under the gun in our world.”

amelia.naismith@pipestoneflyer.ca

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