CFL, CFL Players’ Association extend CBA amendment talks deadline

CFL, CFL Players’ Association extend CBA amendment talks deadline

CFL, CFL Players’ Association extend CBA amendment talks deadline

TORONTO — The CFL and CFL Players’ Association will continue discussing amendments to their collective bargaining agreement that could allow for a shortened 2020 season.

Prior to the start of negotiations last month, the CFL imposed Friday as the deadline for CBA amendments, along with an extension of the deal past its 2021 expiry. It also wanted health-and-safety protocols and federal funding in place by Friday.

But the CFLPA told its members in a memo Friday the CFL has extended the deadline to next week as it awaits word on government assistance.

The CFL would also need to reach an agreement with broadcast partner TSN.

“We await a decision early next week from the federal government when we can work to finalize certainty of compensation for players who are committed to playing in the 2020 season,” the union wrote.

The extension of CBA talks was hardly surprising. Prior to the start of Friday’s session, the CFLPA issued a memo to its membership saying the two sides continue to discuss health-and-safety matters but hadn’t engaged in “meaningful discussions around pay.”

Two sources said any CBA amendments would be for staging an abbreviated ‘20 season and extending the deal past 2021. The CFL and its players must both sign off on any changes to the CBA for a 2020 season to be played.

The sources were granted anonymity as neither the CFL nor the CFLPA have commented publicly about the amendment talks.

Earlier this month, the CFL submitted a revised financial request to Ottawa for roughly $42.5 million in aid. In April, the league asked the federal government for up to $150 million in assistance in the event of a cancelled 2020 season due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

The CFLPA, in its memo, stated, ” … but until the federal government makes a decision on financial support for the league, it is unlikely we will be able to finalize an agreement today (Friday).”

Trouble is, any government support would likely come after the CFL and CFLPA reached their agreement. That’s because the amended CBA would provide definite cost certainty as a requirement for the aid.

The CFL’s revised request will also need co-operation from the six provinces where its franchises are located. That’s because Ottawa is dealing with the league’s offer via the Business Development Bank of Canada (BDC), which is a federal agency but also a crown corporation.

Subsequently, the federal government can’t mandate financial assistance for the CFL.

The BDC is essentially a bank with lending criteria and the CFL is unlikely to qualify given its financial state. To secure financial assistance, the league would likely require the Quebec, Ontario, Manitoba, Saskatchewan, Alberta and B.C. governments to serve as guarantors on any funding provided.

That could be an issue as Ontario sports minister Lisa MacLeod has stated the province has no CFL-specific money and there are many other sectors also requiring government help.

Commissioner Randy Ambrosie has stated the earliest the ‘20 season would begin is September. But he’s also said a cancelled campaign remains a possibility.

If there is indeed a season, it will be staged in Winnipeg. On Tuesday, the league named the Manitoba capital its hub city, pending approval from provincial and federal public health officials.

Under the Manitoba government plan, CFL players and coaches would be in a bubble consisting of hotels, practice fields and a stadium. Players would have to isolate at home for 14 days prior to departing for Winnipeg, be tested for the novel coronavirus upon their arrival then go into quarantine for another seven days.

The general public won’t be allowed into CFL-dedicated hotels or IG Field. The Manitoba government says violations will “result in strict penalties, which could include players being sent home for the remainder of the season.”

An abbreviated ‘20 season would call for each CFL team to play six regular-season games. The expectation is the league will adopt a one-division format, with eight of nine teams qualifying for the playoffs.

The Grey Cup game also would be played at IG Field.

This report by The Canadian Press was first published July 24, 2020.

Dan Ralph, The Canadian Press

CFL

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

File photo
Gov’t of Alberta identifies estimated 300 new COVID-19 cases Sunday

Online COVID-19 dashboard unavailable as upgrades being completed

COVID
Red Deer down to 313 active cases of COVID-19

Alberta reports an additional 411 COVID-19 cases

THE CANADIAN PRESS/Alex Panetta
Economists “cautiously hopeful” for economic recovery in Alberta

Charles St. Arnaud says Alberta’s recovery will rebound along with roll-out of the COVID-19 vaccine

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health Dr. Deena Hinshaw acknowledged that Friday would be one year since the first case of COVID-19 was identified in the province. (photography by Chris Schwarz/Government of Alberta)
Three more Red Deer COVID-19 deaths, 331 active cases in Alberta

Red Deer is down to 362 active cases of the virus

Elvira D’Angelo, 92, waits to receive her COVID-19 vaccination shot at a clinic in Montreal, Sunday, March 7, 2021, as the COVID-19 pandemic continues in Canada and around the world. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Graham Hughes
‘It’s been a good week’: Tam hopeful on vaccines as pandemic anniversary nears

Tam says the addition of two new vaccines will help Canadians get immunized faster

This image provided by Harpo Productions shows Meghan, The Duchess of Sussex, left, in conversation with Oprah Winfrey. (Joe Pugliese/Harpo Productions via AP)
Race, title and anguish: Meghan and Harry explain royal rift

Meghan said she struggled with concerns within the royal family about her son’s skin colour

Kiara Robillard is seen in an undated handout photo. When the pandemic began, Robillard had to rush back home to Alberta from California, where she had been living for five years, after she was struck by a truck that broke her spine in two places. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO-Kiara Robillard, *MANDATORY CREDIT*
‘It kind of clicks:’ Text4Hope program helps with depression, anxiety during pandemic

Participants receive one text message every morning for three months

(The Canadian Press)
‘Worse than Sept. 11, SARS and financial crisis combined’: Tourism industry in crisis

Travel services saw the biggest drop in active businesses with 31 per cent fewer firms operating

Hockey hall-of-fame legend Wayne Gretzky, right, watches the casket of his father, Walter Gretzky, as it is carried from the church during a funeral service in Brantford, Ont., Saturday, March 6, 2021. HE CANADIAN PRESS/Nathan Denette
Walter Gretzky remembered as a man with a ‘heart of gold’ at funeral

The famous hockey father died Thursday at age 82 after battling Parkinson’s disease

Supporters rally outside court as Pastor James Coates of GraceLife Church is in court to appeal bail conditions, after he was arrested for holding day services in violation of COVID-19 rules, in Edmonton, Alta., on Thursday March 4, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jason Franson
‘Law remains valid:’ Pastor accused of violating health orders to remain in jail

The Justice Centre for Constitutional Freedoms is representing the pastor

A decommissioned pumpjack is shown at a well head on an oil and gas installation near Cremona, Alta., Saturday, Oct. 29, 2016. The Alberta Energy Regulator says it is suspending all of the licences held by an oil and gas producer with more than 2,200 wells and 2,100 pipelines after it failed to bring its operations into compliance. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
Alberta Energy Regulator suspends licences of oil and gas producer that owes $67M

The company is being asked to comply with past orders to clean up historic spills and contamination

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau holds a press conference in Ottawa Friday, March 5, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Trudeau holds firm on premiers’ health-care funding demands, COVID-19 aid comes first

Premiers argue that the current amount doesn’t keep pace with yearly cost increases of about five per cent

Most Read